Post Reply 
 
Thread Rating:
  • 0 Votes - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
DIY Fuel Ionizer.
Author Message
think411 Offline
Member
***

Posts: 50
Joined: Apr 2014
Reputation: 0
Post: #11
RE: DIY Fuel Ionizer.
Great link Dan for the ionizer. Someone else passed me this link a few months ago and I think he got it from you but he never gave me the source.
Embarrassed that I posted this link on another post for HCS to think you guys could benefit from it not knowing you had it in place for a while.

I have the same problem you do. My fuel line is metal with one short 12" flex hose leading to the fuel rail. Would not dare to cut this high pressure line thinking to install a filter with the metal pellets unless someone has done the same thing without a problem.
Also would not dare to drop anything in the fuel tank since if it did create a problem, it would be a costly repair.
Do you see a feasible way around this to get the metals in contact with the gas proficiently?
How did others with a fuel injected system mount a filter without a big ordeal of cutting a high pressure metal line?


Update - Thinking of inserting zinc nail wrapped with copper into the pipe fitting in my fuel filter. Just have to take it off and insert.
Will take pics of the set-up and post if done.
Karl
(This post was last modified: 06-04-2014 11:46 PM by think411.)
06-04-2014 12:47 PM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
Edostar Offline
Member
***

Posts: 625
Joined: Jun 2010
Reputation: 18
Post: #12
RE: DIY Fuel Ionizer.
Hi Karl.

I remember a Fuel Catalyst (made by Fitch I think) that was a 'drop-in' version.
It came in a small plastic cage about the size of ones thumb which was designed to be hung in the tank on a length of twine.
This facilitated its possible removal if deemed necessary and I guess you could set up something similar with the 'drop-in' version of the Fuel Ionizer to which this thread is devoted.
I just threw my home made drop-ins into the tank as I doubt that I'll ever remove them and if I did; its not too much of a big deal to pull the tank and remove the fuel pump to get them out.

That Fitch design was not very good as it was just four thick pellets of metal whose surfaces came into contact with the surrounding fuel.
A bunch of little pieces of mixed metals in a fuel filter offers more thorough fuel treatment.
It also has the advantage of being easily home made and virtually free of charge.

Dan.

Download HCS Installation files.
06-06-2014 08:00 PM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
think411 Offline
Member
***

Posts: 50
Joined: Apr 2014
Reputation: 0
Post: #13
RE: DIY Fuel Ionizer.
(06-06-2014 08:00 PM)Edostar Wrote:  Hi Karl.

I remember a Fuel Catalyst (made by Fitch I think) that was a 'drop-in' version.
It came in a small plastic cage about the size of ones thumb which was designed to be hung in the tank on a length of twine.
This facilitated its possible removal if deemed necessary and I guess you could set up something similar with the 'drop-in' version of the Fuel Ionizer to which this thread is devoted.
I just threw my home made drop-ins into the tank as I doubt that I'll ever remove them and if I did; its not too much of a big deal to pull the tank and remove the fuel pump to get them out.

That Fitch design was not very good as it was just four thick pellets of metal whose surfaces came into contact with the surrounding fuel.
A bunch of little pieces of mixed metals in a fuel filter offers more thorough fuel treatment.
It also has the advantage of being easily home made and virtually free of charge.

Dan.

Thanks Dan,
But my tank is sealed and the fill tube has a metal door and an anti siphon device so something cant be dropped down into tank unless its a liquid. This is standard I think in the US so gas cant be stolen.
The only way I see to add these metals is to disconnect the fuel line, pre filter, and stick metal rods in the tube part of the filter or up into the fuel line going toward the tank. Or if one wants to take a chance they can cut the flex fuel line right before the fuel rail to the injectors and install a filter there. Dont know how much pressure is in the line but any cutting and placing a filter on it must be done with the right connection or the line can pop off and leave you stranded with gas all over.
Wold rather do it this way but need to know if its going to be trouble to me or if its feasible with what proper connectors.
Karl
06-07-2014 10:39 PM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
Edostar Offline
Member
***

Posts: 625
Joined: Jun 2010
Reputation: 18
Post: #14
RE: DIY Fuel Ionizer.
Hi Karl.

I fitted an Ioniser fuel filter in the high pressure fuel line on my Ford Escape with regular hose clamps and it hasn't come adrift yet.
The only reason that I didn't attempt this with the high pressure line on my motorcycle is that there simply wasn't enough room.

As for your car fuel tank; there has to be some way in but you may need to remove the tank from the car which is going a bit far in pursuit of a Fuel Ioniser.

Dan.

Download HCS Installation files.
06-08-2014 01:57 AM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
think411 Offline
Member
***

Posts: 50
Joined: Apr 2014
Reputation: 0
Post: #15
RE: DIY Fuel Ionizer.
(06-08-2014 01:57 AM)Edostar Wrote:  Hi Karl.

I fitted an Ioniser fuel filter in the high pressure fuel line on my Ford Escape with regular hose clamps and it hasn't come adrift yet.
The only reason that I didn't attempt this with the high pressure line on my motorcycle is that there simply wasn't enough room.

As for your car fuel tank; there has to be some way in but you may need to remove the tank from the car which is going a bit far in pursuit of a Fuel Ioniser.

Dan.

Hi Dan,
Did you take pics of the set-up?
Wondering if your flex fuel line is the same as mine. I have a flex line right before it enters the fuel rail area and can probably cut that but once I do, I have to install filter securely or I am up the creek. Wont be able to go anywhere if its not a success.
Was looking at filters today that I could install but three different diameter nipples and dont know the right one for this line. Was your line a 12" flex right before fuel rail also? Did you use regular hose clamps?
Did you unhook your battery to prevent pressure from pump?
Did you need special tool to disconnect line or did you just cut and install filter while leaving line connected.
Very nervous on this mod seeing the severity of cutting into a fuel line.
On a side note:
Put zinc, copper and aluminum into the bubbler and it seems the gas was sucked up faster. Thought I got around 100 miles to a cup of gas but now had about 2 cups in there and it was gone within 100 miles. Possible that the gas molecules were "ionized" and evaporated faster. Maybe my imagination but the 2 cups of gas was gone before I did 100 miles. Dont remember it ever evaporating that fast before but then again I havent filled it up enough to get a good idea. Maybe I should do a test with and without the metals and see for sure.
Karl
(This post was last modified: 06-08-2014 06:10 PM by think411.)
06-08-2014 06:09 PM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
Edostar Offline
Member
***

Posts: 625
Joined: Jun 2010
Reputation: 18
Post: #16
RE: DIY Fuel Ionizer.
Hi Karl.

This is a photo of my inline Fuel Ioniser:
[Image: EscapeIoniser_zps92e9475d.jpg]
Bottom left is a location shot.
A is the original (inflexible) fuel line that runs to the injector manofold.
B is one of the two bits of high-pressure fuel hose that I used to join the Ioniser filter to the original fitting (with regular hose clips as you can see).
C is a Fitch fuel catalyst that was already fitted to the car when I bought it second hand.
D is the original fuel line that used to connect to A (currently going into the inlet of the Fitch.

Interestingly; it's testimony to the effectiveness of the home-made Fuel Ioniser that even with an expensive commercial fuel catalyst fitted to the car; I definitely noticed the difference once the home made version was fitted.

Your comments regarding the effects of the mixed metal pellets in your HCS bubbler illustrates the overlap between the HCS thread and this one.
My only comment (having never tried metal pellets in the bubbler) is that the home made Fuel Ioniser apparently works because it allows the fuel to atomise more finely when passed through either a carburettor on an Injector.
I have no idea what the effect of ionised fuel is on the vaporisation of the fuel so to my knowledge; your findings constitute primary research in this field.

Dan.

Download HCS Installation files.
(This post was last modified: 06-09-2014 11:56 PM by Edostar.)
06-09-2014 11:47 PM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
think411 Offline
Member
***

Posts: 50
Joined: Apr 2014
Reputation: 0
Post: #17
RE: DIY Fuel Ionizer.
(06-09-2014 11:47 PM)Edostar Wrote:  Hi Karl.

This is a photo of my inline Fuel Ioniser:

Bottom left is a location shot.
A is the original (inflexible) fuel line that runs to the injector manofold.
B is one of the two bits of high-pressure fuel hose that I used to join the Ioniser filter to the original fitting (with regular hose clips as you can see).
C is a Fitch fuel catalyst that was already fitted to the car when I bought it second hand.
D is the original fuel line that used to connect to A (currently going into the inlet of the Fitch.

Interestingly; it's testimony to the effectiveness of the home-made Fuel Ioniser that even with an expensive commercial fuel catalyst fitted to the car; I definitely noticed the difference once the home made version was fitted.

Your comments regarding the effects of the mixed metal pellets in your HCS bubbler illustrates the overlap between the HCS thread and this one.
My only comment (having never tried metal pellets in the bubbler) is that the home made Fuel Ioniser apparently works because it allows the fuel to atomise more finely when passed through either a carburettor on an Injector.
I have no idea what the effect of ionised fuel is on the vaporisation of the fuel so to my knowledge; your findings constitute primary research in this field.

Dan.

Hi Dan
Thanks for your detail.
I have only one place to connect this and that is cutting the fabric weaved hose right before the fuel rail. Will have to pick up three filters because each has a different diameter on the nipple port.
It also looks like you have the type of filter that cant be opened to insert another filter or the metals suggested. Did you just cut tiny pieces and insert them into the port?
Did take the fuel filter under my truck off and inserted some zinc nails wrapped with a fine copper thread.
The pic is of the nails wrapped in copper. The last two on the left
were the only ones thin enough to fit in the fuel line without blocking the passage for fuel.
Karl


Attached File(s) Thumbnail(s)
   
(This post was last modified: 06-15-2014 11:20 PM by think411.)
06-10-2014 02:42 PM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
Edostar Offline
Member
***

Posts: 625
Joined: Jun 2010
Reputation: 18
Post: #18
RE: DIY Fuel Ionizer.
Hi Karl.

I would guess that little bits of mixed metal loose in a fuel filter would work better than twisted wire in a narrow space like a fuel line.
The 'drop-ins' that I made for my motorcycle fuel tank were a forced compromise as I couldn't think of any other way of doing it.

As for my Ford fuel filter ioniser: yes; I just cut the pieces small enough to drop through the inlet port into the filter and it works well.
The main effect seems to be greater power in the lower rev band and an overall smoothness in the run of the engine.
I can't claim any greater fuel savings but there was a noticeable increase in general burn efficiency that could be felt in the drive.

The only other thing I noticed was that it took a little while for the effects to manifest themselves which is odd.
I would have thought that if it worked; I should have noticed the full effect immediately but in reality the drive got better over the period of a couple of tankfuls.

I know this is the 'fuel saver' forum and the focus is on quantifiable fuel savings but (as I've often pointed out) it's the inefficiency of our engines that wastes the fuel we put in the tank.
The fuel waste is manifested as noise, vibration, heat, smoke and sluggish performance.
It follows then that any decrease in this inefficiency will be equally noticeable in the smooth, quiet run to the engine; increased power and keener engine response, clearer exhaust and cooler engine.
Anyone who notices these symptoms of decreased inefficiency will also notice that they stop at the fuel station fewer times in the month than before.

I've given up trying to calculate my exact fuel consumption due to so many extraneous factors that contrive to skew the figures.
There's an obvious difference between town and highway driving but one sometimes crosses town easily and gets stuck behind trucks on the highway.
The fuel seems to vary in quality from fill to fill and the actual quantity of fuel that goes into the tank is hardly measured with clinical exactitude and varies somewhat from pump to pump.
I don't know how it is in the States or Europe but here in Indonesia; there's a lot of money to be made from recalibrating the pumps and short-changing the customers.

Dan.

Download HCS Installation files.
(This post was last modified: 06-10-2014 04:22 PM by Edostar.)
06-10-2014 04:13 PM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
hendyk78 Offline
Member
***

Posts: 6
Joined: Jul 2014
Reputation: 0
Post: #19
RE: DIY Fuel Ionizer.
made one of this, and dropped it into the tank this morning.
contains stainless steel wool, copper wires, aluminum beads from aluminum foil, and wrap with aluminum foil, and copper wire and stainless steel wire.
I also added magnet beads i took from old motorcycle safety magnet key.

mill make one for the inline one as well.


Attached File(s) Thumbnail(s)
   
08-05-2014 09:45 PM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
Wolfie62 Offline
Member
***

Posts: 2
Joined: Aug 2015
Reputation: 0
Post: #20
RE: DIY Fuel Ionizer.
I drive 55 miles to and from work each day. 110 miles each day, 550 miles per week. In my 99 Jeep Cherokee, I get 19 mpg, depending on my speed and traffic. But a very reliable test "track". I am going to try one of these fuel catalysts, to see if I get any difference in results. But first, I am going to install a thermocouple at the outlet flange of my exhaust header. Then, baseline my exhaust temps before I make any changes. If I am going to be burning fuel more efficiently, or faster, then there should be some change in exhaust temps, if I am getting more Btus from my fuel. Then, after install of the catalyst, I should see some changes in temp and fuel economy. I don't believe in subjective descriptions of how everything has changed by making mods; I only believe in measurable changes.

I found years ago that adding solvents to fuel to make combustion more efficient can work. It can work too well: you can burn your exhaust valves by increasing the burn speed and temps. I did this back in 2001. Hence, I will be adding a pyrometer to measure exhaust temperatures. For safety/damage prevention, it is essential.

As for cutting into the fuel lines, I don't know why there seems to be any overhanging doubts. We are not talking 2500 psi pressures here. 60 psi is typical for the pressure going into a fuel rail of a port injected gasoline engine. Direct injection for gasoline and diesel engines is a different story.....
(This post was last modified: 08-14-2015 08:15 AM by Wolfie62.)
08-14-2015 07:28 AM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
Post Reply 


Forum Jump:


User(s) browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)