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Dry Cell
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Riclay26 Offline
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Post: #1
Dry Cell
What is the difference between dry cell and wet cell?
11-08-2008 09:31 PM
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Riclay26 Offline
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Post: #2
RE: Dry Cell
And what is a PWM?
11-08-2008 09:32 PM
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palongee1 Offline
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Post: #3
RE: Dry Cell
Riclay26 Wrote:And what is a PWM?

Grab a beer and Start reading..you can lost hereSmile...
11-08-2008 09:57 PM
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colchiro Offline
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Post: #4
RE: Dry Cell
A wet cell is a bunch of plates in a container of electrolyte.
A dry cell only has electrolyte between the plates.

http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=wha...M&aq=f&oq=

Rick

Links: Documents / Tuning for Mileage | Toyota Sensors | Autoshop Sensor Tutorials
11-08-2008 10:25 PM
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Riclay26 Offline
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Post: #5
RE: Dry Cell
colchiro Wrote:A wet cell is a bunch of plates in a container of electrolyte.
A dry cell only has electrolyte between the plates.

http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=wha...M&aq=f&oq=

So this.
Pulse Width Modulation
A method of yielding the average current in a PWM driven coil for an electrohydraulic valve. The method includes transmitting a feedback signal into a Finite Impulse Response filter to take multiple signal samples in order to calculate and average value of current within one cycle. This average value is transmitted to an algorithm that generates a pulse width signal that drives the coil of the electrohydraulic valve in the next system cycle.
11-08-2008 11:03 PM
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colchiro Offline
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Post: #6
RE: Dry Cell
Think of it as a knob to turn down the power to your cell to decrease the current it draws.

Rick

Links: Documents / Tuning for Mileage | Toyota Sensors | Autoshop Sensor Tutorials
11-08-2008 11:34 PM
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bylota Offline
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Post: #7
RE: Dry Cell
colchiro Wrote:A wet cell is a bunch of plates in a container of electrolyte.
A dry cell only has electrolyte between the plates.

http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=wha...M&aq=f&oq=

I had the same question. Is it possible to give a little more detail on how a dry cell works, or a reference to a good explanation?

I tried doing a search, but that function lists entire threads containing the words 'cry cell'. I read 5 pages of one thread before I finall came across an obscure reference to a dry cell which was not what I was searching for. Not trying to be too critical, just constructive. Is it possible to narrow searches to specific posts which contain the words being searched for? It would save a tremendous amount of time.
11-09-2008 02:21 PM
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benny Offline
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Post: #8
RE: Dry Cell
Riclay26 Wrote:
colchiro Wrote:A wet cell is a bunch of plates in a container of electrolyte.
A dry cell only has electrolyte between the plates.

http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=wha...M&aq=f&oq=

So this.
Pulse Width Modulation
A method of yielding the average current in a PWM driven coil for an electrohydraulic valve. The method includes transmitting a feedback signal into a Finite Impulse Response filter to take multiple signal samples in order to calculate and average value of current within one cycle. This average value is transmitted to an algorithm that generates a pulse width signal that drives the coil of the electrohydraulic valve in the next system cycle.

That's one explanation.
What a PWM is, as far as HHO generation is concerned, is an electronic controlled switch which chops the power on/off repeatedly to reduce the average current supplied to an HHO generator.
eg. the power may be on for 50% of the time, and off for the remainder of the time.

What some people forget is that with an average current of 10 amps, on a 50:50 or 1:1 mark space ratio the peak current will be 20 amps.

Mark = ON, Space = OFF.
(This post was last modified: 11-09-2008 02:44 PM by benny.)
11-09-2008 02:43 PM
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benny Offline
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Post: #9
RE: Dry Cell
bylota Wrote:
colchiro Wrote:A wet cell is a bunch of plates in a container of electrolyte.
A dry cell only has electrolyte between the plates.

http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=wha...M&aq=f&oq=

I had the same question. Is it possible to give a little more detail on how a dry cell works, or a reference to a good explanation?

I tried doing a search, but that function lists entire threads containing the words 'cry cell'. I read 5 pages of one thread before I finall came across an obscure reference to a dry cell which was not what I was searching for. Not trying to be too critical, just constructive. Is it possible to narrow searches to specific posts which contain the words being searched for? It would save a tremendous amount of time.

Do a search for Tero generator, or Tero cell. There's plenty information available on this particular dry cell design.
(This post was last modified: 11-09-2008 02:48 PM by benny.)
11-09-2008 02:46 PM
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colchiro Offline
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Post: #10
RE: Dry Cell
There's also tons of info if you search for dry cell.

Rick

Links: Documents / Tuning for Mileage | Toyota Sensors | Autoshop Sensor Tutorials
11-09-2008 03:15 PM
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