Post Reply 
 
Thread Rating:
  • 0 Votes - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
E-R Capacitive Amp Limiting - anyone try this?
Author Message
2-Tall Offline
Member
***

Posts: 4
Joined: Oct 2008
Reputation: 0
Post: #1
Shy E-R Capacitive Amp Limiting - anyone try this?
Hi all,
I have several of E-R's books and have read here that others have some of their books too. I was just curious if anyone has tried their capacitive amp limiting technique, or is PWM the prefered method of controling amps? At this point, it seems PWM would be more cost effective as I am having trouble locating caps with the suggested rating that are NOT electrolytic. Not to mention that PWM should be easier as I wouldn't have to go into my alternator to make connections.
In a way, CAL seems to make sense as it apparently adjust amps according to engine speed, but I'm no electronics wiz. There are so many PWM circuits around, it's tough to decide.
Thanks for your input.
Bill
10-16-2008 06:27 AM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
Smudge Offline
Member
***

Posts: 24
Joined: Oct 2009
Reputation: 0
Post: #2
RE: E-R Capacitive Amp Limiting - anyone try this?
I pursued CAL on my first attempt for a BG generator for the same reason, general ignorance of electronics and I did have the idea how to do the math to pick the caps for the alternator.
I went to the alternator repair shop and bought some random replacement rectifier off his shelf for about $8 with a finned aluminum heat sink.
I had him mark with a sharpee which end was positive and negative.
I bought a pair of 35uf oil filled caps and a pair of 45uf which were about the size of 12 and 16 oz pop cans. Soldering wires to the alternator leads were the second most difficult part, opening the alternator case with an impact driver was the hardest, so in other words it was easy.
I don't exactly remember how the wiring went, but I only used 2 caps instead of three. The wiring would go through one cap#1 on one phase, through both caps on another phase and only cap#2 on the third phase if I remember right. This would create a pulsing current. My intention was to reduce costs on buying the caps which were roughly $15 or 20 apice out of one of the surplus catalogs he listed in the Hyzor book.

Results? Considering I didn't have an odometer, was running on jugs of vegetable oil that I was carrying in my trunk, I have no idea either my miles or my gallons. My hho plate holding tank also leaked pretty badly too so I didn't perform a bottle test. The tank did heat up after a few hundred miles and there was some lye residue on the air filter.
The installation was in 06 or 07 on a mechanical injection diesel running on waste vegetable oil and by the seat of my pants, the performance was about the same.
In short, it's doable for someone without electronics understanding.
I still have all the parts and could re hook them and test if some viable numbers are still wanted.

Now that PWM units are available on ebay for pretty cheap, I'd easily go that way over the capacitors.

(10-16-2008 06:27 AM)2-Tall Wrote:  Hi all,
I have several of E-R's books and have read here that others have some of their books too. I was just curious if anyone has tried their capacitive amp limiting technique, or is PWM the prefered method of controling amps? At this point, it seems PWM would be more cost effective as I am having trouble locating caps with the suggested rating that are NOT electrolytic. Not to mention that PWM should be easier as I wouldn't have to go into my alternator to make connections.
In a way, CAL seems to make sense as it apparently adjust amps according to engine speed, but I'm no electronics wiz. There are so many PWM circuits around, it's tough to decide.
Thanks for your input.
Bill
(This post was last modified: 10-11-2009 01:27 PM by Smudge.)
10-11-2009 01:26 PM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
Post Reply 


Forum Jump:


User(s) browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)