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Electrode materials of the future
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starrtraveler Offline
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Electrode materials of the future
Just watched a discovery channel show called Brink. Chemistry professor, Dan Nocera, is using electrodes made of cobalt and phosphate to get the same H2 production with significantly lower power requirement. Quoting the story's claims, as there were no numbers on efficiency increase or actual electrode composition. Was interesting to see, though.

Anyone ever experimented with other electrode materials?? If so, then what kind???

Wade
12-31-2008 10:53 AM
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M98Ranger Offline
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RE: Electrode materials of the future
(12-31-2008 10:53 AM)starrtraveler Wrote:  Just watched a discovery channel show called Brink. Chemistry professor, Dan Nocera, is using electrodes made of cobalt and phosphate to get the same H2 production with significantly lower power requirement. Quoting the story's claims, as there were no numbers on efficiency increase or actual electrode composition. Was interesting to see, though.

Anyone ever experimented with other electrode materials?? If so, then what kind???

Wade

Hydrogen evolution reaction (HER, I just learned the term, refers to the process of making hydrogen by electrolysis at a cathode), can be facilitated by using Co-P(x) that has been electrodeposited at room temperature. Apparently according to an abstract entitled, "Hydrogen evolution and hydrogen sorption on amorphous smooth Me-P(x)(Me=Ni, Co and Fe-Ni) electrodes", "It has been proved that the high activity of Me-P(x) electrodes is caused by dissolved hydrogen in the amorphous layer in the course of the electrodeposition.

I wonder how exactly that works. Perhaps it is because the hydrogen there in the electrode more readily gives up its electron to the circuit allowing dissociation of hydrogen to occur with less resistance because of the fact that electronegativities are identical (refering to the electronegativities of the hydrogen ions). It sounds similar to the mechanism behind PEM (Proton Exchange Membrane) fuel cell technology. Maybe not, but it is a guess. It makes you think about whether or not introducing hydrogen into other metals through electrical means might help to facilitate hydrogen evolution reaction (I love that term now).
(This post was last modified: 12-31-2008 11:55 AM by M98Ranger.)
12-31-2008 11:51 AM
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