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H20 reduction
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M98Ranger Offline
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Post: #1
H20 reduction
I was thinking about water and the fact that electrolysis is going to create a certain amount of steam that will end up sent to the combustion chamber. Then I realized that although a bit has been done to negate this, more can likely be done in the way of cheap water traps to really condense out all of that steam.

The reason the steam is bad is because of the fact that I envision (ie its not fact) that it would steal away more or less of the heat (depending on the amount of steam in the combustion chamber at the time). If we got rid of the water, I beleive that mpg gains would become slightly greater at least and definately more consistent.

That could be an area that people can focus their efforts on. Improving the the quality of the gas going into the combustion chamber.

What do you all think? It's probably been mentioned before, but I still think there is a ton of room for improvement in that area.
(This post was last modified: 12-30-2008 09:41 AM by M98Ranger.)
12-30-2008 09:39 AM
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benny Offline
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Post: #2
RE: H20 reduction
(12-30-2008 09:39 AM)M98Ranger Wrote:  I was thinking about water and the fact that electrolysis is going to create a certain amount of steam that will end up sent to the combustion chamber. Then I realized that although a bit has been done to negate this, more can likely be done in the way of cheap water traps to really condense out all of that steam.

The reason the steam is bad is because of the fact that I envision (ie its not fact) that it would steal away more or less of the heat (depending on the amount of steam in the combustion chamber at the time). If we got rid of the water, I beleive that mpg gains would become slightly greater at least and definately more consistent.

That could be an area that people can focus their efforts on. Improving the the quality of the gas going into the combustion chamber.

What do you all think? It's probably been mentioned before, but I still think there is a ton of room for improvement in that area.

The addition of water vapour, or even steam, in small amounts to the intake of a combustion engine can actually be beneficial to said combustion engine operation. Have another browse through the forum, or Google for same. You might be surprised at what you find.
12-30-2008 01:25 PM
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M98Ranger Offline
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Post: #3
RE: H20 reduction
(12-30-2008 01:25 PM)benny Wrote:  The addition of water vapour, or even steam, in small amounts to the intake of a combustion engine can actually be beneficial to said combustion engine operation. Have another browse through the forum, or Google for same. You might be surprised at what you find.

Thanks I will do that. In fact I have read two pretty good ones. I agree that water is going to be in your system. And the more vaccuum you add to the system as well as the more you increase amps, the more water is going to evaporate into your HHO gas. That said, the vacuum that the engine produces should be plenty if we are only talking about 3 liters of production a minute. All I am saying is that beyond the stoicheometric mix of steam that gets produced through the combustion process water that gets in there is going to lower the combustion temperature and result in more unburned hydrocarbons. That is just fact. It won't "HURT" the engine, but it definately (imo) won't help the efficiency.

The fix for it ostensibly is very simple. You don't actually have to drop the vaccuum if you don't want to. What you need to do is put a few bubbler set up as a dual steam condenser and flash suppressor. The way you use it is by running your tubing down into the water so that the hydrogen and oxygen and steam have to float to the top. As the steam floats to the top with the HHO, some of it will condense. Do that 2 or 3 times and your hho should be pretty darn dry compared to when it came out of the generator. That will increase the combustion temperature and flame front velocity at least marginably. Plus that will allow you to run the generator a lot hotter then you otherwise would be able to because you know that by the third water trap the steam will be condensed out of it. That is the same technology that is used to effectively cool a "Loss of Coolant Accident" in a nuclear reactor. It works. And if it didn't get it adequately design in some fins on the water traps and or add a couple more if there is room.
(This post was last modified: 12-30-2008 07:04 PM by M98Ranger.)
12-30-2008 06:26 PM
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