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HHO amps per square inches
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Daniel Jordan Offline
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Post: #1
HHO amps per square inches
I have been reading "A Practial Guide to Free-Energy Devices" Chapter 10 and in there it talks about parallel plates. 2 plates, at 20 sqin alowing up to 10 amps, and 3 plates (2 gaps) alowing up to 20 amps and 4 plates (3 gaps) allowing up to 30 amps. 2 to 4 sqin for each amp. I'm not sure I understand. If I apply 12VDC across seven gaps (8 plates) of 20 sqin how many amps will I draw? Also I have seen sets ups with 1 directional electric flow and 2 directional flow. What is the advantages of each?
10-22-2008 04:50 PM
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cjpeaceful Offline
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Post: #2
RE: HHO amps per square inches
Would you reference the page for us?

Moderator, please move this thread...thanks!
(This post was last modified: 10-24-2008 08:54 AM by cjpeaceful.)
10-24-2008 08:53 AM
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Daniel Jordan Offline
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Post: #3
RE: HHO amps per square inches
Pg 10-41 and 10-26

If each plate has, say, 20 square inches of area on each face, then with two plates, the electrolysis area is 20 square inches allowing up to 10 amps of current. With the three plate arrangement, the electrolysis area 40 square inches, allowing a current of up to 20 amps through the electrolyser. With the four plate arrangement, the electrolysis area of the electrode plates is 60 square inches, allowing up to 30 amps to be passed through the cell. The higher currents are not a problem with this design because with seven cells in series, there is little heating of the electrolyte and the cell operation remains stable.

If each plate is, say, 5” x 4” with 20 square inches of area on each face, then with two plates, the electrolysis area is 20 square inches allowing up to 10 amps of current. With the three plate arrangement, the electrolysis area is 40 square inches, allowing a current of up to 20 amps through the electrolyser. With the four plate arrangement, the electrolysis area of the electrode plates is 60 square inches, allowing up to 30 amps to be passed through the cell. The higher currents are not a problem with this design because with seven cells in series, there is little heating of the electrolyte and the cell operation remains stable.


There is a strong tendency for bubbles of gas to remain on the surface of the electrodes and impede the electrolysis process. If there were enough bubbles on an electrode, it would not actually touch the electrolyte and electrolysis would stop altogether. Many methods have been used to minimise this problem. The electrode plates are normally made from 16 gauge 316L-grade stainless steel and it is recommended that there be between 2 and 4 square inches of plate area on every face of every electrode for each amp of current passing through the cell. Some people place an ultrasonic transducer underneath the plates to vibrate the bubbles off the plate surfaces. Archie Blue and Charles Garrett made the engine suck its input air through the electrolyser and relied on the air drawn through the electrolyte to dislodge the bubbles. Some people use piezo electric crystals attached to the plates to vibrate the plates and shake the bubbles free, others use magnetic fields, usually from permanent magnets. The best method is to treat the electrode plates with cross-hatch scouring, an extensive cleansing process and an extensive conditioning process. After that treatment, bubbles no longer stick to the electrodes but break away immediately without the need for any form of additional help.
10-24-2008 10:37 AM
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cjpeaceful Offline
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Post: #4
RE: HHO amps per square inches
Okay.

Current, or amperage, is measured across the "gap" or "space" between plates.

If I had an HHO generator with the plate arrange as such, +/-/+/-, I could calculate the maximum total amperage, or current, this generator should see by taking the total exposed surface area of the plates (minus the two most outer surfaces) by .25.

So, if the plates where 4x5, then I would take the total surface area of each plate, which is 40 sq. in. (both sides of the plate), and multiply this by 4. This would give me 160 sq. in. Then, I would subtrate the two most outer plate surfaces (which would be 40 sq. in. total) and this would give me 120 sq. in. Now, take the 120 sq. in. and multiply it by .25 and this will give you the maximum number of amps the generator could experience - 30.

This is abit different than what the author does in his document but the end results are still the same. His way is probably easier do use. He takes the total surface area of one side of a single plate and multiplies this by .5. He then takes this number and multiplies it by the total number of plate "gaps" or "spaces". Using my plate arrangement above it would be:

4 x 5 = 20 surface area of (1) side of a single plate
20 x .5 = 10 amps per plate gap or between (2) plates
10 x 3 = 30 maximum total amps for the generator

Make sense?

As you can see, a generator with few a small electrodes can handle a fairly large number of amps - if it needed to do so.
10-27-2008 07:42 AM
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amos33 Offline
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Post: #5
RE: HHO amps per square inches
Doesn't make sense to me. I use the Area of one plate per stack to figure to total amperage I can draw.

For example, I use a circular area of 3" diameter so my area would be
pi X 1.5*2 = 9.426 square inches.

If I have one stack then my total amps would be 9.426 amps
If I have two stacks then 18.852 amps and so on.

Now if I know the maximum amps my cell can draw without over heating, then I do not need a pwm.

Knowing all this I can design my water cell to meet my needs.

What sayest the room?

I am a Christian
07-23-2013 10:14 AM
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