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How Much HHO Should I Use?
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HydroxgasDrycell Offline
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Post: #51
RE: How Much HHO Should I Use?
How much hho to use ? It does not have a standard answer but once must take into consideration is the quality of the gas .Yes you may have impressive hho output when the cell run hot or warm.However it might contain a lot of water vapor.Example an cell with 1lpm with 50 Celsius never be the same with a cell 1lpm with 80 Celsius.
02-05-2010 10:21 PM
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peter_k Offline
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Post: #52
RE: How Much HHO Should I Use?
(02-05-2010 10:21 PM)HydroxgasDrycell Wrote:  How much hho to use ? It does not have a standard answer but one must take into consideration is the quality of the gas.

I came across a calculator on sid youngs website that was based on a stoichiometric ratio of 1860:1 HHO. This formula used engine capacity x revs at normal operating speeds (eg highway cruise or city driving where higher average engine speeds are common).

You could use these calculations as a baseline but, as stated elsewhere on this thread, you will find variations across vehicles and setups. Some folks report success with less hho, some with more hho. Different operating conditions, vehicle weights, amps and gas quality can be factors to consider.

2.0L 4cyl small car
(2.0L x (3500 RPM/2)) /1860 => 1.9 L/min HHO Highway/City

3.3L V6 medium car
(3.3L x (2500 RPM/2)) /1860 => 2.2 L/min HHO Highway
(3.3L x (3500 RPM/2)) /1860 => 3.1 L/min HHO City

4.0L 6cyl medium car
(4.0L x (2000 RPM/2)) /1860 => 2.2 L/min HHO Highway
(4.0L x (3000 RPM/2)) /1860 => 3.2 L/min HHO City

5.0L V8 large car
(5.0L x (1850 RPM/2)) /1860 => 2.5 L/min HHO Highway
(5.0L x (3000 RPM/2)) /1860 => 4.0 L/min HHO City

7.0L V8 large suv
(7.0L x (1850 RPM /2)) /1860 => 3.5 L/min HHO Highway
(7.0L x (2500 RPM /2)) /1860 => 4.7 L/min HHO City

I have seen on the internet how 1L of water makes 1860L of HHO Gas but I am not sure how this translates to a stoichiometric ratio of 1860:1 when burned in a gasoline engine? The volumes of hho generated in the calculations look about right. Is the ratio 1860:1 valid? perhaps someone can clarify this?

It would be interesting to get some feedback as to how well this formula works in practice!

Peter
02-20-2010 05:17 AM
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xseoer Offline
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Post: #53
RE: How Much HHO Should I Use?
[Image: 94InfinitiO2sensorcontroloptions.jpg]
Very detailed information

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06-15-2010 07:16 PM
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HHOKRAFT.se
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Post: #54
RE: How Much HHO Should I Use?
You allways need to aim at Cool monoton oxygen & hydrogen from your on demand hydrogen system.. If you heatup your system whit to much current or if you use a poorly design system (like many simpel wetcells) you heat your water mix to so hight leves so the water turns to high concentrate of wapervapor instead of monoton oxygen&hydrogen, and the effect in better milage drops especially in petrolengines..

If on demand hydrogen system are going to work you need effective systems whit the right ECU electronic tuning devices
10-19-2010 06:54 AM
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amos33 Offline
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Post: #55
RE: How Much HHO Should I Use?
I am of the opinion that you only need 0.5 - 1.0 lpm to complete the combustion of the fuel. We should not try to replace the fuel we use but rather to aim at more complete combustion. Look at it as a 'additive' not as a alternative. 99% may disagree with me but I believe we will miss the boat if we continue to seek to produce more HHO than is necessary.

My target is 6V at 20A with 1 liter per minute using distilled water and 1 teaspoon of NaOH. I am trying to design my cell around those constraints.

I am a Christian
11-03-2010 02:31 PM
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jw1978 Offline
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Post: #56
RE: How Much HHO Should I Use?
(02-20-2010 05:17 AM)peter_k Wrote:  
(02-05-2010 10:21 PM)HydroxgasDrycell Wrote:  How much hho to use ? It does not have a standard answer but one must take into consideration is the quality of the gas.

I came across a calculator on sid youngs website that was based on a stoichiometric ratio of 1860:1 HHO. This formula used engine capacity x revs at normal operating speeds (eg highway cruise or city driving where higher average engine speeds are common).

You could use these calculations as a baseline but, as stated elsewhere on this thread, you will find variations across vehicles and setups. Some folks report success with less hho, some with more hho. Different operating conditions, vehicle weights, amps and gas quality can be factors to consider.

2.0L 4cyl small car
(2.0L x (3500 RPM/2)) /1860 => 1.9 L/min HHO Highway/City

3.3L V6 medium car
(3.3L x (2500 RPM/2)) /1860 => 2.2 L/min HHO Highway
(3.3L x (3500 RPM/2)) /1860 => 3.1 L/min HHO City

4.0L 6cyl medium car
(4.0L x (2000 RPM/2)) /1860 => 2.2 L/min HHO Highway
(4.0L x (3000 RPM/2)) /1860 => 3.2 L/min HHO City

5.0L V8 large car
(5.0L x (1850 RPM/2)) /1860 => 2.5 L/min HHO Highway
(5.0L x (3000 RPM/2)) /1860 => 4.0 L/min HHO City

7.0L V8 large suv
(7.0L x (1850 RPM /2)) /1860 => 3.5 L/min HHO Highway
(7.0L x (2500 RPM /2)) /1860 => 4.7 L/min HHO City

I have seen on the internet how 1L of water makes 1860L of HHO Gas but I am not sure how this translates to a stoichiometric ratio of 1860:1 when burned in a gasoline engine? The volumes of hho generated in the calculations look about right. Is the ratio 1860:1 valid? perhaps someone can clarify this?

It would be interesting to get some feedback as to how well this formula works in practice!

Peter

Very intreresting , whats the websites namn ?
(02-20-2010 05:17 AM)peter_k Wrote:  
(02-05-2010 10:21 PM)HydroxgasDrycell Wrote:  How much hho to use ? It does not have a standard answer but one must take into consideration is the quality of the gas.

I came across a calculator on sid youngs website that was based on a stoichiometric ratio of 1860:1 HHO. This formula used engine capacity x revs at normal operating speeds (eg highway cruise or city driving where higher average engine speeds are common).

You could use these calculations as a baseline but, as stated elsewhere on this thread, you will find variations across vehicles and setups. Some folks report success with less hho, some with more hho. Different operating conditions, vehicle weights, amps and gas quality can be factors to consider.

2.0L 4cyl small car
(2.0L x (3500 RPM/2)) /1860 => 1.9 L/min HHO Highway/City

3.3L V6 medium car
(3.3L x (2500 RPM/2)) /1860 => 2.2 L/min HHO Highway
(3.3L x (3500 RPM/2)) /1860 => 3.1 L/min HHO City

4.0L 6cyl medium car
(4.0L x (2000 RPM/2)) /1860 => 2.2 L/min HHO Highway
(4.0L x (3000 RPM/2)) /1860 => 3.2 L/min HHO City

5.0L V8 large car
(5.0L x (1850 RPM/2)) /1860 => 2.5 L/min HHO Highway
(5.0L x (3000 RPM/2)) /1860 => 4.0 L/min HHO City

7.0L V8 large suv
(7.0L x (1850 RPM /2)) /1860 => 3.5 L/min HHO Highway
(7.0L x (2500 RPM /2)) /1860 => 4.7 L/min HHO City

I have seen on the internet how 1L of water makes 1860L of HHO Gas but I am not sure how this translates to a stoichiometric ratio of 1860:1 when burned in a gasoline engine? The volumes of hho generated in the calculations look about right. Is the ratio 1860:1 valid? perhaps someone can clarify this?

It would be interesting to get some feedback as to how well this formula works in practice!

Peter

Very intreresting , whats the websites namn ?
(This post was last modified: 01-20-2011 09:49 AM by jw1978.)
01-20-2011 09:15 AM
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danek Offline
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Post: #57
RE: How Much HHO Should I Use?
(01-20-2011 09:15 AM)jw1978 Wrote:  
(02-20-2010 05:17 AM)peter_k Wrote:  
(02-05-2010 10:21 PM)HydroxgasDrycell Wrote:  How much hho to use ? It does not have a standard answer but one must take into consideration is the quality of the gas.

I came across a calculator on sid youngs website that was based on a stoichiometric ratio of 1860:1 HHO. This formula used engine capacity x revs at normal operating speeds (eg highway cruise or city driving where higher average engine speeds are common).

You could use these calculations as a baseline but, as stated elsewhere on this thread, you will find variations across vehicles and setups. Some folks report success with less hho, some with more hho. Different operating conditions, vehicle weights, amps and gas quality can be factors to consider.

2.0L 4cyl small car
(2.0L x (3500 RPM/2)) /1860 => 1.9 L/min HHO Highway/City

3.3L V6 medium car
(3.3L x (2500 RPM/2)) /1860 => 2.2 L/min HHO Highway
(3.3L x (3500 RPM/2)) /1860 => 3.1 L/min HHO City

4.0L 6cyl medium car
(4.0L x (2000 RPM/2)) /1860 => 2.2 L/min HHO Highway
(4.0L x (3000 RPM/2)) /1860 => 3.2 L/min HHO City

5.0L V8 large car
(5.0L x (1850 RPM/2)) /1860 => 2.5 L/min HHO Highway
(5.0L x (3000 RPM/2)) /1860 => 4.0 L/min HHO City

7.0L V8 large suv
(7.0L x (1850 RPM /2)) /1860 => 3.5 L/min HHO Highway
(7.0L x (2500 RPM /2)) /1860 => 4.7 L/min HHO City

I have seen on the internet how 1L of water makes 1860L of HHO Gas but I am not sure how this translates to a stoichiometric ratio of 1860:1 when burned in a gasoline engine? The volumes of hho generated in the calculations look about right. Is the ratio 1860:1 valid? perhaps someone can clarify this?

It would be interesting to get some feedback as to how well this formula works in practice!

Peter

Very intreresting , whats the websites namn ?
(02-20-2010 05:17 AM)peter_k Wrote:  
(02-05-2010 10:21 PM)HydroxgasDrycell Wrote:  How much hho to use ? It does not have a standard answer but one must take into consideration is the quality of the gas.

I came across a calculator on sid youngs website that was based on a stoichiometric ratio of 1860:1 HHO. This formula used engine capacity x revs at normal operating speeds (eg highway cruise or city driving where higher average engine speeds are common).

You could use these calculations as a baseline but, as stated elsewhere on this thread, you will find variations across vehicles and setups. Some folks report success with less hho, some with more hho. Different operating conditions, vehicle weights, amps and gas quality can be factors to consider.

2.0L 4cyl small car
(2.0L x (3500 RPM/2)) /1860 => 1.9 L/min HHO Highway/City

3.3L V6 medium car
(3.3L x (2500 RPM/2)) /1860 => 2.2 L/min HHO Highway
(3.3L x (3500 RPM/2)) /1860 => 3.1 L/min HHO City

4.0L 6cyl medium car
(4.0L x (2000 RPM/2)) /1860 => 2.2 L/min HHO Highway
(4.0L x (3000 RPM/2)) /1860 => 3.2 L/min HHO City

5.0L V8 large car
(5.0L x (1850 RPM/2)) /1860 => 2.5 L/min HHO Highway
(5.0L x (3000 RPM/2)) /1860 => 4.0 L/min HHO City

7.0L V8 large suv
(7.0L x (1850 RPM /2)) /1860 => 3.5 L/min HHO Highway
(7.0L x (2500 RPM /2)) /1860 => 4.7 L/min HHO City

I have seen on the internet how 1L of water makes 1860L of HHO Gas but I am not sure how this translates to a stoichiometric ratio of 1860:1 when burned in a gasoline engine? The volumes of hho generated in the calculations look about right. Is the ratio 1860:1 valid? perhaps someone can clarify this?

It would be interesting to get some feedback as to how well this formula works in practice!

Peter

Very intreresting , whats the websites namn ?

too much gas...2.0L 4cyl....need 0.5-0.8lpm clean gas Smile
08-13-2011 06:39 PM
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EmissionO Offline
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Post: #58
RE: How Much HHO Should I Use?
(02-20-2010 05:17 AM)peter_k Wrote:  I came across a calculator on sid youngs website that was based on a stoichiometric ratio of 1860:1 HHO. This formula used engine capacity x revs at normal operating speeds (eg highway cruise or city driving where higher average engine speeds are common).

You could use these calculations as a baseline but, as stated elsewhere on this thread, you will find variations across vehicles and setups. Some folks report success with less hho, some with more hho. Different operating conditions, vehicle weights, amps and gas quality can be factors to consider.

2.0L 4cyl small car
(2.0L x (3500 RPM/2)) /1860 => 1.9 L/min HHO Highway/City

3.3L V6 medium car
(3.3L x (2500 RPM/2)) /1860 => 2.2 L/min HHO Highway
(3.3L x (3500 RPM/2)) /1860 => 3.1 L/min HHO City

4.0L 6cyl medium car
(4.0L x (2000 RPM/2)) /1860 => 2.2 L/min HHO Highway
(4.0L x (3000 RPM/2)) /1860 => 3.2 L/min HHO City

5.0L V8 large car
(5.0L x (1850 RPM/2)) /1860 => 2.5 L/min HHO Highway
(5.0L x (3000 RPM/2)) /1860 => 4.0 L/min HHO City

7.0L V8 large suv
(7.0L x (1850 RPM /2)) /1860 => 3.5 L/min HHO Highway
(7.0L x (2500 RPM /2)) /1860 => 4.7 L/min HHO City

I have seen on the internet how 1L of water makes 1860L of HHO Gas but I am not sure how this translates to a stoichiometric ratio of 1860:1 when burned in a gasoline engine? The volumes of hho generated in the calculations look about right. Is the ratio 1860:1 valid? perhaps someone can clarify this?

It would be interesting to get some feedback as to how well this formula works in practice!

Peter

Ok so I am a newbie in this forum but have been involved with HHO and cell design for a few years now. I am not a backyard designer but work solely on getting all this technology to work through experimentation and redesign.

The above makes very interesting reading but I do wonder where this figure of 1860/1 ratio came from....what was the experiment that concluded this was the correct stoichiometric value? I have searched for Sid Young's website (http://www.fireinthewater.com) but it is no longer hosted. Can anyone let me know anything regards this as we are about to go to a test facility next week in order to try and ascertain the exact stoichiometric value in order to get complete combustion.

As has been stated in many other threads producing beyond the amount required to get complete combustion is a waste of energy and will have a detrimental effect on the MPG which is why users will see MPG return drop as they continue to increase HHO production rates beyond the most efficient value for their engine size.

So where does this figure of 1860/1 come from?
01-26-2012 03:45 AM
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Mr. Binford 2000 Offline
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Post: #59
RE: How Much HHO Should I Use?
Check out this site http://www.free-energy-info.co.uk , and I don't know why the 1860 number, I remember it being the number of liters of hho gas produced from 1 liter of water though.
01-28-2012 04:28 PM
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amos33 Offline
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Post: #60
RE: How Much HHO Should I Use?
(01-28-2012 04:28 PM)Mr. Binford 2000 Wrote:  Check out this site http://www.free-energy-info.co.uk , and I don't know why the 1860 number, I remember it being the number of liters of hho gas produced from 1 liter of water though.

The number 1860 is wrong. It should be 1839.33 and based on the fact that 1 liter of water contains 1234.44 liters of hydrogen and 604.69 liters of oxygen.

How do we know this?

1 liter of water weighs 1000 grams. 11.11% is hydrogen by mass and 88.89% is oxygen by mass. 111.11 grams of hydrogen and 888.89 grams of oxygen are in 1000 grams of water.

1 liter of hydrogen weighs 0.09 grams and 1 liter of oxygen weighs 1.47 grams. 111.11/0.09 = 1234.44 liters of hydrogen and 888.89/1.47 = 604.69 liters of oxygen in 1 liter of water.

How could this info help us?

I'll let you figure that one out.

I am a Christian
05-15-2012 09:06 AM
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