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NaOH Electrolyte Problem
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sumbich Offline
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Post: #1
NaOH Electrolyte Problem
HI all, I'm new to the forum but not new to HHO. I have a question. I am having a problem with my current new electrolyte, NaOH, a.k.a Sodium Hydroxide. I use 1/4 teaspoon to 6 cups distilled water and tweak my PWM to 6.75 to 7.5 amps (on full blast it runs about 9.5 amps). The car runs just fine in the garage while allowing the engine 15 mins or so to adjust to the gas, but as soon as I get it out of the driveway and start revving the engine, my 30 amp fuse blows.

I have two PWM boards and found that I blew a resistor on my first one, which was allowing amp spikes through (because I was so frustrated put a 40 amp fuse in, oops :P ) so then switched to the new one, which solved the problem except for the continuous fuse blowing.

I used to use Baking Soda + Distilled Water + Alcohol + Hydrogen Peroxide electrolyte mix, and never had this problem, but I switched because NaOH doesn't eat plates and also because I had to run baking soda at about 15 amps or so to get the same production. I am so frustrated, I am thinking about either going back to Baking Soda or taking the PWM and fuse breaker out and running it straight DC to my switch and monitoring amperage directly through NaOH electrolyte amount.

Can someone please tell me what I'm doing wrong? This has been driving me nuts all week. I thank you all in advance.
02-22-2009 09:41 AM
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benny Offline
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Post: #2
RE: NaOH Electrolyte Problem
(02-22-2009 09:41 AM)sumbich Wrote:  HI all, I'm new to the forum but not new to HHO. I have a question. I am having a problem with my current new electrolyte, NaOH, a.k.a Sodium Hydroxide. I use 1/4 teaspoon to 6 cups distilled water and tweak my PWM to 6.75 to 7.5 amps (on full blast it runs about 9.5 amps). The car runs just fine in the garage while allowing the engine 15 mins or so to adjust to the gas, but as soon as I get it out of the driveway and start revving the engine, my 30 amp fuse blows.

I have two PWM boards and found that I blew a resistor on my first one, which was allowing amp spikes through (because I was so frustrated put a 40 amp fuse in, oops :P ) so then switched to the new one, which solved the problem except for the continuous fuse blowing.

I used to use Baking Soda + Distilled Water + Alcohol + Hydrogen Peroxide electrolyte mix, and never had this problem, but I switched because NaOH doesn't eat plates and also because I had to run baking soda at about 15 amps or so to get the same production. I am so frustrated, I am thinking about either going back to Baking Soda or taking the PWM and fuse breaker out and running it straight DC to my switch and monitoring amperage directly through NaOH electrolyte amount.

Can someone please tell me what I'm doing wrong? This has been driving me nuts all week. I thank you all in advance.

With the PWM and HHO generator disconnected, check the voltage across the battery with car idling then with car revving. Depending on vehicle type, I would normally expect around 14 - 14.2 volts with the car revving. If your voltage goes well above this, I suspect you may have a dodgy regulator in your alternator. (Word of caution. Apparently some cars run with alternator output voltage levels as high as 16V. If yours is one of these, you may wish to take the supply for the generator system directly from the battery terminal connections. Check your handbook)
If voltage levels are normal, then set set up the HHO generator without the PWM in circuit, and with a weak electrolyte solution, run the engine to get the HHO generator to around its normal working temp. Adjust electrolyte strength to get the maximum current draw your PWM can safely handle, or that you want as your top limit, without blowing a fuse (engine revving), refit the PWM into your circuit, and tweak to the current level you want to run through your generator, again with engine revving..
You will need a good ammeter, and a voltmeter to do this properly.
Don't use a multi-meter to test current, unless it is rated to at least the max current you will draw. Most cheaper ones only allow 10 amps without an external shunt resistor.
(This post was last modified: 02-22-2009 10:12 AM by benny.)
02-22-2009 10:09 AM
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sumbich Offline
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Post: #3
RE: NaOH Electrolyte Problem
(02-22-2009 10:09 AM)benny Wrote:  
(02-22-2009 09:41 AM)sumbich Wrote:  HI all, I'm new to the forum but not new to HHO. I have a question. I am having a problem with my current new electrolyte, NaOH, a.k.a Sodium Hydroxide. I use 1/4 teaspoon to 6 cups distilled water and tweak my PWM to 6.75 to 7.5 amps (on full blast it runs about 9.5 amps). The car runs just fine in the garage while allowing the engine 15 mins or so to adjust to the gas, but as soon as I get it out of the driveway and start revving the engine, my 30 amp fuse blows.

I have two PWM boards and found that I blew a resistor on my first one, which was allowing amp spikes through (because I was so frustrated put a 40 amp fuse in, oops :P ) so then switched to the new one, which solved the problem except for the continuous fuse blowing.

I used to use Baking Soda + Distilled Water + Alcohol + Hydrogen Peroxide electrolyte mix, and never had this problem, but I switched because NaOH doesn't eat plates and also because I had to run baking soda at about 15 amps or so to get the same production. I am so frustrated, I am thinking about either going back to Baking Soda or taking the PWM and fuse breaker out and running it straight DC to my switch and monitoring amperage directly through NaOH electrolyte amount.

Can someone please tell me what I'm doing wrong? This has been driving me nuts all week. I thank you all in advance.

With the PWM and HHO generator disconnected, check the voltage across the battery with car idling then with car revving. Depending on vehicle type, I would normally expect around 14 - 14.2 volts with the car revving. If your voltage goes well above this, I suspect you may have a dodgy regulator in your alternator. (Word of caution. Apparently some cars run with alternator output voltage levels as high as 16V. If yours is one of these, you may wish to take the supply for the generator system directly from the battery terminal connections. Check your handbook)
If voltage levels are normal, then set set up the HHO generator without the PWM in circuit, and with a weak electrolyte solution, run the engine to get the HHO generator to around its normal working temp. Adjust electrolyte strength to get the maximum current draw your PWM can safely handle, or that you want as your top limit, without blowing a fuse (engine revving), refit the PWM into your circuit, and tweak to the current level you want to run through your generator, again with engine revving..
You will need a good ammeter, and a voltmeter to do this properly.
Don't use a multi-meter to test current, unless it is rated to at least the max current you will draw. Most cheaper ones only allow 10 amps without an external shunt resistor.

Benny, thanks for the quick reply. I found what the problem was. I went through some rebuilding of my generator last week and forgot the fact that I had new terminals on top. When my hood is closed, the generator fits just under, but touches the hood, receiving ground current. I found that when I covered the positive lead with some bubble wrap (only temporarily for testing) and closed the hood to do a test run everything worked fine. Revved the engine quite high during the testing also, everything works as of now. It must have shorted out when I went around turns and such, which shifted the generator and caused the positive lead to touch the hood. Jeez, so much of thinking of the basics...

Now I just have to think up something to mount on the underside of the hood to keep the terminal(s) from shorting out.

Thanks again! Smile
02-22-2009 12:40 PM
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benny Offline
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Post: #4
RE: NaOH Electrolyte Problem
(02-22-2009 12:40 PM)sumbich Wrote:  
(02-22-2009 10:09 AM)benny Wrote:  
(02-22-2009 09:41 AM)sumbich Wrote:  HI all, I'm new to the forum but not new to HHO. I have a question. I am having a problem with my current new electrolyte, NaOH, a.k.a Sodium Hydroxide. I use 1/4 teaspoon to 6 cups distilled water and tweak my PWM to 6.75 to 7.5 amps (on full blast it runs about 9.5 amps). The car runs just fine in the garage while allowing the engine 15 mins or so to adjust to the gas, but as soon as I get it out of the driveway and start revving the engine, my 30 amp fuse blows.

I have two PWM boards and found that I blew a resistor on my first one, which was allowing amp spikes through (because I was so frustrated put a 40 amp fuse in, oops :P ) so then switched to the new one, which solved the problem except for the continuous fuse blowing.

I used to use Baking Soda + Distilled Water + Alcohol + Hydrogen Peroxide electrolyte mix, and never had this problem, but I switched because NaOH doesn't eat plates and also because I had to run baking soda at about 15 amps or so to get the same production. I am so frustrated, I am thinking about either going back to Baking Soda or taking the PWM and fuse breaker out and running it straight DC to my switch and monitoring amperage directly through NaOH electrolyte amount.

Can someone please tell me what I'm doing wrong? This has been driving me nuts all week. I thank you all in advance.

With the PWM and HHO generator disconnected, check the voltage across the battery with car idling then with car revving. Depending on vehicle type, I would normally expect around 14 - 14.2 volts with the car revving. If your voltage goes well above this, I suspect you may have a dodgy regulator in your alternator. (Word of caution. Apparently some cars run with alternator output voltage levels as high as 16V. If yours is one of these, you may wish to take the supply for the generator system directly from the battery terminal connections. Check your handbook)
If voltage levels are normal, then set set up the HHO generator without the PWM in circuit, and with a weak electrolyte solution, run the engine to get the HHO generator to around its normal working temp. Adjust electrolyte strength to get the maximum current draw your PWM can safely handle, or that you want as your top limit, without blowing a fuse (engine revving), refit the PWM into your circuit, and tweak to the current level you want to run through your generator, again with engine revving..
You will need a good ammeter, and a voltmeter to do this properly.
Don't use a multi-meter to test current, unless it is rated to at least the max current you will draw. Most cheaper ones only allow 10 amps without an external shunt resistor.

Benny, thanks for the quick reply. I found what the problem was. I went through some rebuilding of my generator last week and forgot the fact that I had new terminals on top. When my hood is closed, the generator fits just under, but touches the hood, receiving ground current. I found that when I covered the positive lead with some bubble wrap (only temporarily for testing) and closed the hood to do a test run everything worked fine. Revved the engine quite high during the testing also, everything works as of now. It must have shorted out when I went around turns and such, which shifted the generator and caused the positive lead to touch the hood. Jeez, so much of thinking of the basics...

Now I just have to think up something to mount on the underside of the hood to keep the terminal(s) from shorting out.

Thanks again! Smile

Glad to hear you found the problem. If you can't move the generator to a different location, try sticking a piece of rubber matting on top. Bath mat? Cheap and effective and can be bought almost anywhere.
(This post was last modified: 02-22-2009 03:18 PM by benny.)
02-22-2009 03:17 PM
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sumbich Offline
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Post: #5
RE: NaOH Electrolyte Problem
(02-22-2009 03:17 PM)benny Wrote:  
(02-22-2009 12:40 PM)sumbich Wrote:  
(02-22-2009 10:09 AM)benny Wrote:  
(02-22-2009 09:41 AM)sumbich Wrote:  HI all, I'm new to the forum but not new to HHO. I have a question. I am having a problem with my current new electrolyte, NaOH, a.k.a Sodium Hydroxide. I use 1/4 teaspoon to 6 cups distilled water and tweak my PWM to 6.75 to 7.5 amps (on full blast it runs about 9.5 amps). The car runs just fine in the garage while allowing the engine 15 mins or so to adjust to the gas, but as soon as I get it out of the driveway and start revving the engine, my 30 amp fuse blows.

I have two PWM boards and found that I blew a resistor on my first one, which was allowing amp spikes through (because I was so frustrated put a 40 amp fuse in, oops :P ) so then switched to the new one, which solved the problem except for the continuous fuse blowing.

I used to use Baking Soda + Distilled Water + Alcohol + Hydrogen Peroxide electrolyte mix, and never had this problem, but I switched because NaOH doesn't eat plates and also because I had to run baking soda at about 15 amps or so to get the same production. I am so frustrated, I am thinking about either going back to Baking Soda or taking the PWM and fuse breaker out and running it straight DC to my switch and monitoring amperage directly through NaOH electrolyte amount.

Can someone please tell me what I'm doing wrong? This has been driving me nuts all week. I thank you all in advance.

With the PWM and HHO generator disconnected, check the voltage across the battery with car idling then with car revving. Depending on vehicle type, I would normally expect around 14 - 14.2 volts with the car revving. If your voltage goes well above this, I suspect you may have a dodgy regulator in your alternator. (Word of caution. Apparently some cars run with alternator output voltage levels as high as 16V. If yours is one of these, you may wish to take the supply for the generator system directly from the battery terminal connections. Check your handbook)
If voltage levels are normal, then set set up the HHO generator without the PWM in circuit, and with a weak electrolyte solution, run the engine to get the HHO generator to around its normal working temp. Adjust electrolyte strength to get the maximum current draw your PWM can safely handle, or that you want as your top limit, without blowing a fuse (engine revving), refit the PWM into your circuit, and tweak to the current level you want to run through your generator, again with engine revving..
You will need a good ammeter, and a voltmeter to do this properly.
Don't use a multi-meter to test current, unless it is rated to at least the max current you will draw. Most cheaper ones only allow 10 amps without an external shunt resistor.

Benny, thanks for the quick reply. I found what the problem was. I went through some rebuilding of my generator last week and forgot the fact that I had new terminals on top. When my hood is closed, the generator fits just under, but touches the hood, receiving ground current. I found that when I covered the positive lead with some bubble wrap (only temporarily for testing) and closed the hood to do a test run everything worked fine. Revved the engine quite high during the testing also, everything works as of now. It must have shorted out when I went around turns and such, which shifted the generator and caused the positive lead to touch the hood. Jeez, so much of thinking of the basics...

Now I just have to think up something to mount on the underside of the hood to keep the terminal(s) from shorting out.

Thanks again! Smile

Glad to hear you found the problem. If you can't move the generator to a different location, try sticking a piece of rubber matting on top. Bath mat? Cheap and effective and can be bought almost anywhere.

Thanks for the tip, I'll be sure to check into it at Lowe's (or Walmart). Smile
02-23-2009 06:46 AM
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hydroxmobile Offline
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Post: #6
RE: NaOH Electrolyte Problem
Get the right mix of distilled water and NaOH powder

3KG NaOH to 10L distilled water
05-21-2009 09:18 PM
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