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Newb to HHO
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hoocher Offline
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Post: #1
Newb to HHO
Hi everyone, just joined here after a few co-workers starting talking to me about their HHO projects and results. I've been doing some research but it's really hard to find "real" answers, perhaps cause this technology is still in the closet so to speak. I do have an electrical background and I'm familiar with electrolosys but I like to find the facts before I start messing around with my car (1995 Honda Prelude H22A OBDI). I've recently thought about buying a newer car to improve fuel economy and reliability but after looking at all the new car options, I really don't like the options that are available. Seems like I would have to compromise between fuel economy and performance. I don't have a long commute to work (8 miles one way) and my avg combined mpg is around 26mpg right now so it's not that bad but gas prices will only increase and I would like to be fearless on those long road trips. I probably would be taking a trip during this long weekend right now if it wasn't for the fear of gas prices on my wallet. Okay enough for the introductions.

I got a few questions:

I hear that HHO is not harmful on an engine and it is actually higher in octane rating, is this true and how much octane are we talking, above the 93? I have a high compression engine (10.6:1) and I'm worried about knocking or high temps, especially at higher rpms (7500rpm redline).

EFIE: I know I need one for the O2 sensor but I can't find any info on how people are programming/tuning it. I realize it is trying to lean out the A/F mixture by tricking the O2 sensor into thinking everything is normal but when do you know you've got to that point, what data are you looking for. If you have a higher output HHO generator feeding your intake, that means more oxygen would be sensed by the O2 sensor so you have to compensate more in terms of millivolts from the EFIE to the ecu? A smaller output HHO would mean you have to compensate less, so does it depend on the HHO lpm going into the engine. This is for me, the dangerous part cause I don't want to lean out the engine so much that it runs hot and dies, but if you don't compensate enough, then you won't get the mpg results desired. Also, for you guys that have installed it, do you guys splice the wiring just before going into the ecu so that you can have the EFIE mounted in the cabin of the car instead of under the hood? Best practices are to have it hooked up with the HHO system to turn on/off at the same time.

Okay last question, I'm not that interested in "making" my own parts so I want to buy a pre-made kit and there is so much variation that it's overwhelming. So much spam and scams to sift through that I feel like just saying hell with it. So anyone have any recommendations of which HHO system is truly reliable and shows results with minimal maintenance. I was looking at this one site but not sure if this is a fair price to pay. I think I would buy the EFIE from here instead to go with the kit ($397).

hhokitsdirect.com
07-03-2012 08:04 AM
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LittleGreenDot Offline
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Post: #2
RE: Newb to HHO
Hi Hoocher,
(taken from hhoforums.com http://www.hhoforums.com/showthread.php?t=714)
"The octane rating of gasoline tells you how much the fuel can be compressed before it spontaneously ignites. When gas ignites by compression rather than because of the spark from the spark plug, it causes knocking in the engine. Knocking can damage an engine, so it is not something you want to have happening. Lower-octane gas (like "regular" 87-octane gasoline) can handle the least amount of compression before igniting.
*Hydrogen does not fit well into the normal definitions of octane number. It has a very high Research Octane Number (RON) and a low Motor Octane Number (MON) so that it has low knock resistance in practice, due to its low ignition energy (primarily due to its low dissociation energy) and extremely high flame speed. Basically this means that hydrogen will ignite easier and have a lower octane rating at higher rpms and higher compression ratios.

That being said, hydrogen has been reported to have an octane rating of 130, and the fact that some people claim that hho made their knock go away would seem to support this.

However... HHO is 2 parts hydrogen and one part oxygen, so the octane rating and how your engine reacts, one would likely have to take into account the oxygen content as well.

Also one must keep in mind than not all HHO generators produce HHO of the same proportions. As the atoms are separated by the electrolysis. Hydrogen bubbles begin to collect on the (- Anode) plates, and Oxygen collects on the (+ Cathode) plates. So 1/3 of the gas produced is Oxygen, and the other 2/3 is Hydrogen.

Octane aside HHO does make the gas burn more quickly so the more HHO you add in the more you will need to retard the timing.

what I would like to say in summary is: when injecting HHO, less is more."

As far as the efie is concerned it is controlled with a "pot" (potentiometer) you turn the pot to change the offset voltage. Our efies have a range of 450mV. O2 sensors run on a 1V scale so you won't be able to lean the engine to a dangerous point. You want to cut the signal wire, not splice it. Having the efie in the cab is a good idea in my opinion so you can have a friend adjust it on the fly.
HHOdirect is a guy named Bob Volk, he purchases his efies from us and his kit looks good. Go for it. It is a more than fair price, our kits (http://www.dry-cells.com) are $575.00
Dot
07-03-2012 02:18 PM
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hoocher Offline
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Post: #3
RE: Newb to HHO
Thanks for the informative reply Dot, I'm feeling more confident about installing an HHO kit on my car now. After reading the post about the honda S2000 getting 40mpg results, it's more reassuring to me that my engine can take it. I was a little worried at first about how many amps I had to run to get the HHO produced but after hearing around 6 amps for a 2L engine on some kits, I'm not that worried about killing my alternator. I'm also thinking of getting this PWM since I've been seeing a lot of poor results were due to a lack of control and output of HHO from their generator.

http://www.adicorp.net/php/kzx1250_order.php

I'm waiting on doing an engine swap on my car before I start this HHO project. My engine is acting up and it's time to replace it (almost 400k kms). Once I get this new engine installed, I'll start posting each step of my project and eventually some good results.
07-07-2012 02:24 PM
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