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O2 senses temp...too...
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ghahai ghato Offline
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Post: #1
O2 senses temp...too...
Check this out...

http://www.drexchan.fotopic.net/c597354.html

Any useful feedback....?
10-14-2008 09:25 PM
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Atfab Offline
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Post: #2
RE: O2 senses temp...too...
Yes, that 02 sensor is reacting properly. If you monitored it in the car from a cold start, with a scanner you would see the same thing. If he had hooked up the heater circuit, it would have heated quicker.

This is why the car starts in open loop, the 02 sensor will not read right until it heats up.

Atfab
99 S-10 Pickup 2.2L auto, Std cab, Short bed, Alum cap
Stock, Ave. 25.5 MPH
10-15-2008 06:37 AM
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realtyroy Offline
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Post: #3
RE: O2 senses temp...too...
The 02 sensor is the main thing the computer looks at to determine when its time to go into closed loop. It will also look at the coolant temp sensor but the o2 has priority.

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10-15-2008 08:46 AM
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ghahai ghato Offline
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Post: #4
RE: O2 senses temp...too...
I've read in a forum of two type of O2 sensor in the market...

1) Voltage differential base (common)
- Voltage adder EFIE will do the trick.

2) Frequency base (used in Ford cars in US)
- frequency base O2 sensor, just add resistor at ground signal will reduce amount of fuel injection.

How to indentify which O2 is which? and is what suggested correct?

Any comments... TQ
10-15-2008 10:00 PM
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Atfab Offline
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Post: #5
RE: O2 senses temp...too...
ghahai ghato Wrote:I've read in a forum of two type of O2 sensor in the market...

1) Voltage differential base (common)
- Voltage adder EFIE will do the tric[/color]k.

This is the type in the photo link you posted, it is a narrow band 02 sensor. outout varies about 0.05v to 0.9v on most. An EFIE or voltage adder will work.


2) Frequency base (used in Ford cars in US)
- frequency base O2 sensor, just add resistor at ground signal will reduce amount of fuel injection.

This is a wide band sensor, I am told that resistance in the output or ground wire will work on some cars. Sorry I don't know any more about these.

How to indentify which O2 is which? and is what suggested correct?

Perhaps someone else can help out here.

Any comments... TQ

Atfab
99 S-10 Pickup 2.2L auto, Std cab, Short bed, Alum cap
Stock, Ave. 25.5 MPH
10-16-2008 05:54 AM
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ghahai ghato Offline
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Post: #6
RE: O2 senses temp...too...
Thanx Atfab...

How to indentify which O2 is which?
I'll be hooking it up with a mutimeter to see what kinda reading it puts out...

and is what suggested correct?
Perhaps trial an error here... only two option available...

Please comment... TQ

p.s. Here's a good readup..
http://www.aa1car.com/library/o2sensor.htm
(This post was last modified: 10-16-2008 09:57 PM by ghahai ghato.)
10-16-2008 09:49 PM
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ghahai ghato Offline
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Post: #7
RE: O2 senses temp...too...
Finally got the multimeter hooked onto my O2 sensor wire...and I'm able to see some interesting datas...

1st off - from the way my O2 sensor behaves and what I've read here and elsewhere, I think I've got a narrowband.

Now here's my observations;

Idle : voltage flucs from 0.010+ to 0.800+ (at times as high as .900++)
No significant diff when the HHO gen is turned on or off.

Town driving : voltage flucs from 0.200+ to 0.800+
Upon decelleration in gear would dive to as low as -0.010
Upon excelleration gone to 0.900++ to a rare 1.0 (hot midday traffic)

Highway (maintaining at a constant throttle position at 90km/h) : voltage flucs from mostly 0.300+ (lowest 0.200+) to 0.800+ (highest 0.900+)
Seems to have an average of 0.400+ (just as explained by many O2 sensor web-sites)
However...... I've noticed that on a very flat stretch of highway the signals seem to slowly settle down at 0.500+ and slowly but surely creeps down to 0.300+....
I only had 2 brief occations to observe this as the highway i was on was quite hilly...
I was also playing with the EFIE & HHO, turning it off and on to if there's any diffs in signals but I could not see any significant rise or fall in signals if there's any...hmmm....

Wow, I quite amazed at what these data's are showing... here's more...

Open loop to closed loop...
Cold start : signal starts at 0.010 slowly creeps to 0.200+ (in several secs) then jumps to 0.800+ to 0.900+ and stay there for 5 mins before fluctuating again....

Normal start : same as above....

Now I understand why my daily short trips MPG is sooo bad....
So, with these info I hacked my EFIE to come on upon startup.... and the result is that the ECU reacts by dipping the signal to 0.100+ when it sees 0.900+mV for a few secs, then starts to fluctuate thereafter... WOW... so I guess the hacked EFIE might have kicked started the ECU into closed loop sooner....

Any comments.... TQ
10-20-2008 09:29 PM
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splatman2 Offline
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Post: #8
RE: O2 senses temp...too...
ghahai ghato Wrote:I've read in a forum of two type of O2 sensor in the market...

1) Voltage differential base (common)
- Voltage adder EFIE will do the trick.

2) Frequency base (used in Ford cars in US)
- frequency base O2 sensor, just add resistor at ground signal will reduce amount of fuel injection.

How to indentify which O2 is which? and is what suggested correct?

Any comments... TQ


Just add a resisitor? Any idea where to get info on this? I'm working on a 2008 Ford Focus and No having much luck with it. So this is something else to try.
Thanks

"The Boy has no patience" Yoda
"He will learn patience. Was I any different when you taught me?" Obi-Wan
10-21-2008 08:33 AM
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ghahai ghato Offline
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Post: #9
RE: O2 senses temp...too...
splatman2 Wrote:
ghahai ghato Wrote:I've read in a forum of two type of O2 sensor in the market...

1) Voltage differential base (common)
- Voltage adder EFIE will do the trick.

2) Frequency base (used in Ford cars in US)
- frequency base O2 sensor, just add resistor at ground signal will reduce amount of fuel injection.

How to indentify which O2 is which? and is what suggested correct?

Any comments... TQ

Just add a resisitor? Any idea where to get info on this? I'm working on a 2008 Ford Focus and No having much luck with it. So this is something else to try.
Thanks

I'm starting to get a little confussed now...

" There is another variety of wide band sensor that uses 4 wires, that you must be aware of. These are not actually called oxygen sensors (although that's what they are). They are called Air Fuel Ratio (AFR) sensors. EFIEs are definitely known to NOT work with these sensors. "
- taken from http://www.fuelsaver-mpg.com/doc/HowManyEFIEs.html

Wide Range Air/Fuel Sensor/ WRAF sensor
http://www.aa1car.com/library/wraf.htm

"Wide Band Sensors

Good news! You can use the same EFIE on the signal wire of a wide band. The one wide band that I modified used the blue wire for the signal. Wide bands will have 5 wires. That’s the dead give-away. They have been used widely on VWs and Mazdas.
AFR Sensors

AFR sensors operate under a totally different set of rules. The same sensor is used in 2 different ways by various OEMs. One method involves putting a fixed voltage on the reference wire (white) and varying the current to maintain a fixed voltage on the signal wire (blue). Another method is to apply a fixed voltage and current to the reference wire, and monitor the voltage coming out. Either way, they are current devices, not voltage devices.

To alter an AFR sensor, cut the blue signal wire and install low value resistors. The range will be 30 ohms or less. Most of the vehicles I’ve modified have liked the 7 to 18 ohm range. I’ve never needed over 20 ohms as of yet. Again, an Ohm Ranger or low value pot will be helpful in your tuning. You will be able to feel 1 ohm resistance change.

Editors note: We have not had luck using a resistor on an AFR sensor. If you do this handling, please document your mileage before and after this one step, and if you have success, please contact me and let me know. We recommend doing the MAP and temp sensor handlings if you have AFR sensors."
- taken from http://www.fuelsaver-mpg.com/doc/TuningForMileage.html

Anyone knowledgeable please advice...

Good Luck man... please remember to post result... TQ
10-21-2008 09:45 PM
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ghahai ghato Offline
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Post: #10
RE: O2 senses temp...too...
Update on the hacked EFIE....

This morning's cold start did not cause any problem with the hacked EFIE...
The throttle started at 1,500rpm as usual and slowly creep down to below 1,000rpm even though the O2 signal fluctuates...

So, looks like cold start is no issue here... so far so good...
10-21-2008 09:50 PM
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