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Older vehicle requirements?
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deweydomer Offline
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Post: #1
Older vehicle requirements?
All the information I have read regarding hydrogen assist talkes about the oxygen sensor and having to deal with it. One place mentioned that 1995 and newer vehicles had to have the efie device for it to work properly. What about vehicles older than that? I have a 1987 ful size Ford, which has fuel injection, but I am not sure if it has an O2 sensor. Did they first start using those at a later date? Would the efie device not be needed on a vehicle like this?[/size][/color][/font]
03-23-2008 09:50 AM
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xcite Offline
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RE: Older vehicle requirements?
Yes it has an O2 sensor on it and would also require an EFIE for modifications to work.
03-23-2008 10:36 AM
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mike Offline
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RE: Older vehicle requirements?
Hi deweydomer! Welcome to the forum!

Please see the article, "What Do I Need To Know About My Oxygen Sensor?". This will help you determine if you need an EFIE.

Older cars with fuel injection almost certainly have oxygen sensors that the EFIE will be needed for. Newer cars sometimes have AFR (Air Fuel Ratio) sensors that EFIEs will not work with.

Please post again if your questions are not cleared up.

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03-23-2008 02:18 PM
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deweydomer Offline
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RE: Older vehicle requirements?
OK, thanks.
So how often, and for what reasons, do the sensors get replaced? I've never replaced them on this vehicle, because I've never thought much about them, or that they needed any attention. Before I even think about doing anything else to the vehicle, everything that is on there now should be working properly. How do I know that they are? Do I have to take it to a shop and spend big bucks to have them do all kinds of tests on it, or are there things I can be doing myself?

Thanks,[/size]
03-23-2008 08:08 PM
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mike Offline
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RE: Older vehicle requirements?
Well, first of all, I just wanted you to read that article to get a grip on the types of sensor that exist. Probably you have the narrow band sensor that an EFIE can handle for you. But you need to know that it's not wideband or an AFR sensor before you buy an EFIE and waste your money.

But, if your sensor is completely out of whack, it'll throw a check engine light. If you have no light, your sensor is at least "OK". They do get old as the years go by, and become less accurate. But we don't really care about that too much as we're going to modify it's signal anyway. So I wouldn't worry about taking it to a shop.

One test you can make is to measure your sensor's signal wire to ground with a volt meter. You should see voltages between about .2 to about .9 (probably inside those extremes), and changing constantly. It's not a perfect test, but if you see that your sensor is probably fine.

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03-23-2008 09:25 PM
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deweydomer Offline
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RE: Older vehicle requirements?
Yes, I read the article, but have not been able to get a look at the sensors as of yet.

My vehicle does not have a "check engine" light of any kind, so there is nothing that would give me an indication that they would not be working properly. It has only an "engine" light, which is for engine temp or oil pressure. Guess I'll just have to crawl under the thing and take a closer look.

Thanks for the tips.
03-24-2008 04:57 AM
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mike Offline
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RE: Older vehicle requirements?
The engine light is the one I'm talking about. If you have injectors, you have an ECU (although many different acronyms are used for the computer), and the computer registers it's errors by lighting up the engine light. It's not just oil and engine temp, but other things such as damaged sensors as well.

I recommend you get some documentation as it suggests in the article. It's not just for the oxygen sensor that I recommend this. Aside from the fact that it's generally a good idea to have a manual for your vehicle, you may well find yourself adjusting other sensors during the course of your fuel savings project. I'll bet you can get a Haynes on ebay for your vehicle for $10 or less. The wiring diagram is $11 and they send it the next day via email. I find myself referring to both of mine rather frequently. Either of these references will tell you what you need to know, and will allow you to pick up your sensor wire up by the ECU where it's much more convenient.

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03-24-2008 05:12 AM
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deweydomer Offline
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Post: #8
RE: Older vehicle requirements?
I have a Ford manual for the vehicle, so I'll just have to start looking through it's many pages.
I've had this vehicle for 18 years, and have never had the engine light come on for any reason, other than when starting the car.
Things I had read lead me to believe it came on for only the reasons I stated previously, but obvously I was mistaken. Much more reading needed on my part.

Thanks again,

Kevin
03-24-2008 08:21 AM
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xcite Offline
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RE: Older vehicle requirements?
I believe that I can say that all Fords in the late 80's and early 90's used narrow band O2 sensors that I know of. But getting to know your vehicle is very important and you should definately have manuals on it, as Mike stated, before attemting modifications to the system.

I do however disagree about old O2 sensors, they do need to be replaced occasionally as they do become inaccurate and erratic in thier operation. If we have an erratic operating sensor and we adjust for it we will still have an erratic signal but with an offset now. My personal opinion is that all systems need to be functioning properly before modifications can be made. From my person experience I have found this to be true.

If you imagine for example that a normally functioning device holds a setting to 2 positions on a scale and an erratic device may only hold 3-4 positions on a scale. When we make an offset modification it may only hold 4-5 positions on the scale on that same erratic device. The reason it grows is that the erratic device is already out of spec and adding an offset multiplies the affect.

With that being said a very good site to study up on Ford systems is
fordfuelinjection.com
Hope this helps you.
03-24-2008 08:38 AM
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mike Offline
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RE: Older vehicle requirements?
I can't argue with xcite's disagreement with my post. I'm afraid he's more right than I am on the point of the old oxygen sensor. You can get them for about $30-$40 at www.car-stuff.com.

But we've gotten off the subject of what you started to ask about, and that's what type of sensor your have, if you need an EFIE etc. Has that been answered for you? (realize that if you say no, we're just going to tell you to get a manual so you can find out Big Grin )

Seriously, let me know if you still have questions.

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(This post was last modified: 03-27-2008 02:41 AM by mike.)
03-24-2008 08:46 AM
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