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RVS treatment
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Gary Offline
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Post: #31
RE: RVS treatment
That reminds me of a product that was here in the states some time back. I think it was called molybdenum disulfide or something like that. It was also sold as an oil, for squeaky hinges and such.
Anyone remember that?
I'm no fool either, and that's what I meant when I said I'd like to see more reviews on the product. I don't jump on the first banana boat out of port until I see if there are snakes aboard first.
Testimonials are shit. Give me reviews, and if there are enough of them, on enough different sites, blogs, or whatnot, and I may almost, sort of, reluctantly begin to trust what I see on the web.
Then I want independent studies. Even reviews can be skewed by expectant consumers.
IF this product can work, it would seem to me that it works only on a microscopic level, as contact is necessary to activate it. But the idea of it filling up a gear tooth falls short when I really think on it:
The hot edge gets ground smooth and pores or scratches filled with ceramic. Okay, "ceramic steel" (bs) - then it supposedly continues to fill the gap...but if it works by HEAT, then did not the first coating eliminate that heat and therefore stop the process? So how could it continue to fill a void, unless it can work from pressure alone?
But...if that is so, then as it fills a gap, the pressure would increase, the filling would continue until your motor parts or gears were a solid mass of ceramic. It just logically doesn't make sense yet.
07-11-2009 05:31 AM
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Mika Offline
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Post: #32
RE: RVS treatment
I think that the reaction stops when there's not enough heat. That's why it don't fix all the problems, hydraulic valve lifters etc. I don't fully understand what it does.

Maybe I should post some finnish reviews, cause there aren't much english. You'll understand the pictures.

http://www.rvs.fi/kuluttajille/testit/do...in_v07.pdf

http://www.rvs.fi/kuluttajille/testit/do...ti2002.pdf

http://www.rvs.fi/kuluttajille/testit/images/RVS_1.jpg

http://www.rvs.fi/kuluttajille/testit/images/RVS_2.jpg

http://www.rvs.fi/kuluttajille/testit/do...tt_eng.pdf

http://www.rvs.fi/kuluttajille/testit/do...gazine.pdf

http://www.rvs.fi/kuluttajille/testit/do...mpopuu.pdf

http://www.rvs.fi/kuluttajille/testit/do...%20384.wmv Puskuri tv-program drives Ford Sierra 160 km without oil after treatment, then camshaft "seal" gets broken... Then oil to the engine and another 160 km without other problems. just bs...

http://www.ffp.fi/bb/viewtopic.php?t=23359 forum talk with some compression test etc.

http://www.sporttiauto.com/tuotteet/rvs/...echnology/

Quess these are all shit and people were paid to write these...

Gary, if it costs $80, it's still quite a lot cheaper and easier to do than engine restoration, isn't it?
07-12-2009 02:21 AM
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Gary Offline
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Post: #33
RE: RVS treatment
Be careful. I said testimonials are shit. We've had a plethora of online ads over here complete with pictures, tesimonials and whatnot that were completely bogus, but often look very professional.
I looked at the links, and near as I can understand, it seems to give a surface coating to metal initially.
The $80 investment is still out with the jury until mileage testing comes into play. Just because it makes a difference (and I agree it appears to) initially, doesn't mean your $80 doesn't disappear in a couple thousand miles or less.
Secondly, about the fifth link down is a torque and hp chart. From about 2 to 3000 rpm there is almost no change. But that's where my engines run - 1000-3000rpm, so I wouldn't expect to feel much.
I think if the video were translated to english it would be the most valuable. And to know just who those people were in it.
As I said, I'm not stupid, and I do know how to pay attention.
As for running an engine without oil, I bring to mind the product "Prolong". I have an aerosol can of their oil, have tried it on my garage door, hinges, and other things. I still had to re-oil that door a year later, but yea, you can run an engine without oil treated with it. I never figured that one out.
07-12-2009 03:47 AM
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Mika Offline
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Post: #34
RE: RVS treatment
On the first link they also run a car engine on idle for an hour without oil and there were no overheating and the engine run steadily from the beginning to the end. You just speak wrong language to read the best parts.

Wouldn't you think your car had better mpg if the engine turned over easier and cylinder pressures increased?

You don't have to try it, it's your decision. But don't you ever call me a liar or fraud if I'm only trying to bring some information to help you.
07-13-2009 03:15 AM
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Llew Offline
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Post: #35
RE: RVS treatment
Molly Slip, the trade name for a friction reducing additive. As I've said before, I used so sell it when I owned a garage in the UK. " garage" Service station and auto repair workshop.
I was driving a diesel truck. around 20 Ton. When the was a bang and the oil light came on, we stopped to investigate left the engine running. There was a hole in the sump, all the oil had run out. As the engine was still running, I decided to drive it back to the workshop. About 25 mikes, we made it OK. I was amazed the owner had installed Molly Slip. We striped the engine down and found no damage apart from the hole in the sump and a broken oil pump. The truck went back into service with no further incidents.
07-13-2009 04:57 AM
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Gary Offline
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Post: #36
RE: RVS treatment
I'm not calling you anything Mika, it's just a debate.
It sounds like there may be some products that will keep an engine from seizing with no oil pressure, and more may be on the way.
07-13-2009 04:06 PM
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Llew Offline
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Post: #37
RE: RVS treatment
As regards compression, there would be no improvement there. A word of caution though, do not install in a new engine. The rings and bearing need about 500 miles to wear in. ( running in period )
In my experience no claims for more MPG were made.
Hey Guys, a question. I am making an HHO generator. I have been advised on several types of electrolyte. Baking soda, caustic soda and sulphuric acid diluted 5:1.
Advice please
(This post was last modified: 07-13-2009 11:05 PM by Llew.)
07-13-2009 11:01 PM
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Mika Offline
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Post: #38
RE: RVS treatment
Llew, could you already understand that this is not your "molly slip"? It's totally different thing.
07-14-2009 11:03 PM
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thomasbala Offline
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Post: #39
RE: RVS treatment
(07-13-2009 11:01 PM)Llew Wrote:  As regards compression, there would be no improvement there. A word of caution though, do not install in a new engine. The rings and bearing need about 500 miles to wear in. ( running in period )
In my experience no claims for more MPG were made.
Hey Guys, a question. I am making an HHO generator. I have been advised on several types of electrolyte. Baking soda, caustic soda and sulphuric acid diluted 5:1.
Advice please
Stay away from baking soda; it produces CO2, the same flame retardant that is in fire extinguishers; NaOH or KOH will work but don't spill it on anything aluminum and make sure you've got a double bubbler, or put some vinegar in your bubbler to neutralize any Sodium Hydroxide (NaOH) or Potassium hydroxide (KOH) coming out of your generator. Sulphuric acid is a poor producer. I've had luck with citric acid and HTC Metal Stain Remover (sold at Wal-Mart in the swimming pool chemicals section).
07-15-2009 10:57 AM
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Gary Offline
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Post: #40
RE: RVS treatment
Your air filter won't like it either, but I came up with a fix if it gets eated:
http://www.fuel-saver.org/Thread-Acid-ea...ter-repair
07-15-2009 05:20 PM
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