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Safety factors involved with HHO Gen in truck bed?
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biggy boy Offline
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Post: #1
Question Safety factors involved with HHO Gen in truck bed?
Hi there!
I'm thinking of putting a 14 plate tero cell in my bed of a 2001
GMC sierra 4.8 V8
I have a rigid folding panel tonneau cover on the box.
I'm concerned what could happen if I have an HHO leak from the gen, bubbler or lines in the box and having the gas build up in the box under the tonneau.
I was thinking I might need to put in a vent in the cover with some sort of snorkel vent to keep the rain from getting in.

What is everyone's opinion on this?


Glen

2001 GMC Sierra 4.8
(This post was last modified: 08-08-2009 02:45 PM by biggy boy.)
08-08-2009 02:44 PM
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Gary Offline
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Post: #2
RE: Safety factors involved with HHO Gen in truck bed?
If you have even the slightest air passage under the cover, I mean it not being totally sealed to the truck, the HHO gas will disperse immediately to combine with the ambient air beneath and be very, very diluted. It seems that there is a property to this gas that causes it to self-disperse rather than hang out in concentrates, even though it rises first. You have very little to worry about there, if you have even one vent. I will imagine that in the boating field, they would have some nice little weather-resistant vents that look good for engine bays. Two of those would also keep things cooler under there in the summer, and look cool too.
But I doubt that your tailgate is airtight.
08-08-2009 03:19 PM
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biggy boy Offline
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Post: #3
RE: Safety factors involved with HHO Gen in truck bed?
Thanks Gary!
As long as it disperses that should be OK then.
I was worried that because it is lighter then air it might get trapped up against the cover and hang there.
But I guess that would be better then a gas that is heavier then air sitting in the bottom of the box building up until it filled the whole box.

I plane to use a pmw to control the generator outputs LPM
I'm now in the process of taking lots of base line readings, mpg...
with my Maxitrip it the same as a scanguage II but costs lot less.
I'll Tie into the air intake just before the throttle body after the MAF.
Will use two air bubblers and one arrester at the motor.
I'll tie the cell power into an ignition circuit that only powers when the truck is running, fuse it at 30 amps, use a relay .......

Gary I see you have installed a HHO system on a GMC/Chev8v
Any tips for success?
You appear to be able to get improvements with out any MAP/MAF enhancements!?!?!?
Have you tried an O2 EFIE yet?

I'm not looking for big gains just 4-5 MPG would be nice and 5-8 would be great Smile

Thanks
Glen

2001 GMC Sierra 4.8
(This post was last modified: 08-08-2009 06:02 PM by biggy boy.)
08-08-2009 05:50 PM
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Gary Offline
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RE: Safety factors involved with HHO Gen in truck bed?
You may get a few mpg by finding your sweet spot of low amps vs. viable output. All you can do here is start at the bottom and raise the amps tank by tank (hopefully driving the same route) until gains drop off, then dilute back to where it worked best.
If you're running an EFIE, it's all different, and you can run more amps/output. You will easily get 5mpg or more with an EFIE, but remember, it's the EFIE doing most of the work...IMO. Basically, the HHO is cooling down the combustion process by speeding it up and allowing less heat to penetrate heads, pistons, cylinders.
You seem to know what you're doing.
I'll be experimenting with another vacuum switch design soon, and putting it on our car to eliminate the hydrolizer during accelleration. I believe that HHO does no good when accellerating, and the alternator drag does just that: drags.
We keep improving on designs, and hopefully are not running on hidden trails allready gone to dead ends. It would seem that no one else has thought of this one. Now I've brought it up, I'm sure some dorks will claim it as their own. Oh well. My posts are dated.
08-08-2009 06:29 PM
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biggy boy Offline
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Post: #5
RE: Safety factors involved with HHO Gen in truck bed?
I was also thinking of experimenting with putting two to four
large 12 volt batteries in the box. they are free to me, are in good shape and are the type used to start big diesel power generators.

Any way the plan is to use these batteries to run the cell and to power the truck for short commutes IE: to work and Back 20 minute drive each way.
I would have a switch that disables the alternator and make it stop being used in the charging system. Just run off of the two to four big batteries in the bed.
Once at work plug it in and charge the batteries up for the trip home.

I know what some may think the added weight will kill any gains from not running a loaded down alternator, but I think it is worth experimenting with.

Any thought would be appreciated.
Plus the added weight would be good once the snow starts Smile

2001 GMC Sierra 4.8
(This post was last modified: 08-08-2009 07:23 PM by biggy boy.)
08-08-2009 07:17 PM
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Gary Offline
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Post: #6
RE: Safety factors involved with HHO Gen in truck bed?
This is an old discussion.
Put two 80-lb. rocks in your trunk. See what happens to your mileage.
Yes, snow traction is a plus.
Divide any infintestimal savings you get by the cost of hauling them around, and wonder what you'd have done with the trunk space.
Sorry man, there are reasons why no one's doing it. However, there are a couple of guys using a single battery for short runs to work; I can't say wether or not it was efficient for them.
08-09-2009 04:38 AM
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biggy boy Offline
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RE: Safety factors involved with HHO Gen in truck bed?
(08-09-2009 04:38 AM)Gary Wrote:  This is an old discussion.
Put two 80-lb. rocks in your trunk. See what happens to your mileage.
Yes, snow traction is a plus.
Divide any infintestimal savings you get by the cost of hauling them around, and wonder what you'd have done with the trunk space.
Sorry man, there are reasons why no one's doing it. However, there are a couple of guys using a single battery for short runs to work; I can't say wether or not it was efficient for them.

I Know what you are saying about the weight of the rocks.
More load more fuel burnt.... but those rocks didn't allow the alternator to be turned off. Plus the rocks don't run the HHO Cell and a cell also adds load to the alternator. Smile
Your point is a very good thing to keep in mind!
and I really appreciate you input.

OK I'm off to do some reading on the subject of not using an alternator for short drives Hmm

2001 GMC Sierra 4.8
08-09-2009 06:25 AM
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cmac Offline
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Post: #8
RE: Safety factors involved with HHO Gen in truck bed?
Put a water trap in your line going to your engine compartment. I use one designed for a air compressor with the filter removed, it has a spring loaded drain at the bottom and is clear to check the water level. The line will get water condensation in it. I use 2 bubblers in the back and one under the hood, mainly to make sure I have clean hydroxy going in the intake. Cheers
08-14-2009 11:35 AM
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biggy boy Offline
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Post: #9
RE: Safety factors involved with HHO Gen in truck bed?
(08-14-2009 11:35 AM)cmac Wrote:  Put a water trap in your line going to your engine compartment. I use one designed for a air compressor with the filter removed, it has a spring loaded drain at the bottom and is clear to check the water level. The line will get water condensation in it. I use 2 bubblers in the back and one under the hood, mainly to make sure I have clean hydroxy going in the intake. Cheers

OK I know the ones you mean. Is it in the back of your truck or did you put it in the engine compartment?

I was planning on two bubblers in the back of the truck the second one with vinager in it to neutralize the Caustic. and then a DIY flame arrestor right at the motor.

2001 GMC Sierra 4.8
08-14-2009 05:36 PM
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cmac Offline
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Post: #10
RE: Safety factors involved with HHO Gen in truck bed?
I ran a solid line under the truck mounted to the frame with a gradual pitch to the trap with about equal distance from both sides. I still get water vapor in the line to the intake from the bubbler under the hood, I haven't found a way to prevent this yet.
I do have some concerns about the amount of hydroxy in my system, it has a blow off type cap on the bubblers. I've ran this way for more than a year now with no apparent problems.
08-15-2009 01:05 PM
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