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Series Cell and design
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AlexR Offline
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Series Cell and design
I wrote this post in hopes more people will convert to using a series cell electrolyzer. I’ve seen a few posts touching on the subject but thought I would add my 2 cents.
I'll keep this first post brief and to the point. It is not over-simplified, but a good overview to begin with.

It appears that most on this forum are working with a parallel plate electrolyzer. They do work, they make Brown's Gas (BG) and obviously many of you are getting a mileage gain to make this all worth it.

I just think there is a better (more efficient) way.

This is the main problem I see with the parallel plate design. These run on a voltage of 2 volts. They are being hooked up to a 14 volt source. This is pretty close to a direct short. They are being made useable by reducing the amount of catalyst in the water to keep from having amperage run away. This design does work, again many of you are seeing a mileage gain, so it does work, but I will list a few problem with this design.

Overheating
These parallel cells also have overheating problems, again a small amount of catalyst in the electrolyte keeps things from basically melting. I wonder how much of the output from a hot cell is BG and how much is steam. Steam injection is good for your engine and mileage enhancement. It is much more efficient to make steam from a waste heat source such as the exhaust than from an electrical source such as the alternator that ultimately required fuel to produce it.

Water and electrolyte
Due to the above problem it seems like water and electrolyte is being added rather often. Every day or every few days?
On my HyZor I add 70 ml of water about every 1200 to 1400 miles. This is about once a month or less. If you built a series cell that made more BG than the HyZor you would add more water during each fill up, but my point is the frequency of the fill up, not the amount.

Freezing
The solutions to the above problems are a small amount of catalyst so the amp draw is not too high. The down side of this is that the solution freezes in the winter.



A parallel plate is basically this,

+-

Many have more plates to make more gas,

+-+-+-+-+-
The above is still a parallel plate design.

Some add neutrals to the mix, but unless the electrolyte is isolated from the rest of the cell with these plates they are still a parallel plate design.

A series cell

+NNNNN-

The key to the above is that every neutral is isolating the cell next to it. If those neutrals are just hanging inside the solution then they are more isolators than neutrals.

The advantages of a series cell

1. More efficient so less load on your alternator to make the same amount of gas.

2. No voltage mismatch. The series cell is designed to run on 14 volts. In fact it can be built for 120 volts if you want. The number of plates determines the voltage.

3. Overheating is a thing of the past as each cell is receiving the correct voltage and amperage. No amperage runaway. The electricity is now being used efficiently to make BG and not heat.

4. Adding water. Because of a more efficient design less water is being boiled off and so the electrolyzer does not need to be filled nearly as often. I'm not saying it's a magic electrolyzer that never needs water, it just doesn't need to be filled as often. The electrolyte is a one time addition that stays inside the electrolyzer.

5. Freezing is a thing of the past as one now uses a stronger solution of the catalyst. My HyZor is good down to 40 below zero.



Dry Cell

I'm not sure exactly who came up with that name or why, but a dry cell has the potential to become a good series cell. From what I have seen the design has each cell isolated from the one next to it. This is ideal. A small hole is needed to keep the fluid levels even between plates as I’m sure has been discovered.

This design is also easily taken apart, tweeked, tuned, etc. This makes it great for experimenting.

Plate Spacing

The one problem I see with the dry cell is that it needs greater plate spacing. More like 3/8”. I understand these are made with O-rings which are very convenient and don’t leak. As far as I know no one makes a 3/8” thick O-ring. I have another idea but not sure if it will work at this point, I’ll post that once I figure that out. The close plate spacing being used is too close and the bubbles of BG being produced get in the way of actual gas production.





The usual disclaimer…….

I don’t mean this to be a complete instruction manual, just a guide to steer one in the direction of the series cell.

On my web site I do sell the ER HyZor. The HyZor is a series cell design. The reason for this post is not to tell everyone to buy an ER HyZor. You can build a series cell at home too without giving me a penny. I just want people to get better mileage and reduce their emissions to help the planet. Of course I would have nothing against someone buying a HyZor from me Smile

Of course I'll be happy to answer any questions. I also do ask that this thread stays on topic.

I will update this post with new ideas and/or corrections.

Alex

Cool Flame, LLC
http://www.cool-flame.com
(This post was last modified: 12-01-2008 07:50 AM by AlexR.)
12-01-2008 07:48 AM
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AlexR Offline
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Post: #2
RE: Series Cell and design
Reserved for future info

Alex

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12-01-2008 07:49 AM
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stl_hemi Offline
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Post: #3
RE: Series Cell and design
EPDM o ring gaskets can go up to 1/4". I have 3/16" on my drycells but they smash down to almost 1/16"
Series are the deffinate way to go.

Paul
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12-01-2008 12:40 PM
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Gary Offline
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Post: #4
RE: Series Cell and design
Yeah, I don't know where you get that idea of the huge spacing on a dry cell. I've found 1/8" is great for getting flow and good conductivity but if the setup is done right or you have a pump (I have one coming) you can use 1/16". But dry cells are sensitive to flow, so you have to have the reservoir/bubbler and hoses set up correctly.
Good article, regardless.
(This post was last modified: 12-01-2008 03:28 PM by Gary.)
12-01-2008 03:28 PM
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colchiro Offline
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Post: #5
RE: Series Cell and design
I just checked my still-not-assembled dry cell and I'd have to use 7 gaskets to make 3/8 inch compressed. That's barely 1/16 inch.

Rick

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12-01-2008 04:15 PM
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AlexR Offline
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Post: #6
RE: Series Cell and design
A spacer of some kind is required.

Perhaps a spacer with an o-ring on each side of it. The spacer to give you the space and an o-ring on each side of it to make the seal against the plate.

Alex

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12-01-2008 04:30 PM
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AlexR Offline
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Post: #7
RE: Series Cell and design
Gary Wrote:Yeah, I don't know where you get that idea of the huge spacing on a dry cell. I've found 1/8" is great for getting flow and good conductivity but if the setup is done right or you have a pump (I have one coming) you can use 1/16". But dry cells are sensitive to flow, so you have to have the reservoir/bubbler and hoses set up correctly.
Good article, regardless.

Gary,

What are you using for electrolyte? And what concentration?
I think the wider spacing allows a stronger solution meaning better freeze protection.

Alex

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12-01-2008 04:34 PM
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Gary Offline
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Post: #8
RE: Series Cell and design
Yeah, but more caustic danger to your engine, or local components in the event of a leak. I use whatever it takes to get the amps and heat I want in whatever design I have. Nowadays, I don't fool with anything but dry cells or sealed series units.
I live in Georgia, just above Atlanta - not too worried about freezing yet.
12-01-2008 04:49 PM
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abe Offline
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RE: Series Cell and design
Alex help me understand what you are saying. I'm a Pipefitter not an engineer some of this stuff is over my head ,but find it very interesting. I'm running a dry cell now. 5x3 plates spaced 1/8" apart running +nnnn-nnnn+. It run at 18 amps temp.around 90 I'm using 1 teaspone of NaHO per leter of water,running through a bubbler.Also have a EFIE set at 325. I went from 18 to 40 mpg's are you saying that's from steam. If so, is that a bad thing. I ask because I dont want to damage my engine. Also how much energy does it take to run a alternator,they seem to be easy to turn by hand.
Thanks for the info.
(This post was last modified: 12-01-2008 06:26 PM by abe.)
12-01-2008 06:13 PM
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Gary Offline
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Post: #10
RE: Series Cell and design
But your hand won't turn them at 3000+rpm. It turns out that the loads are a bit less than most of us supposed, and losing a couple horses on a v-8 won't matter much especially when you're not trying to use them.
My new mantra is to put vinegar in the bubbler instead of water, to neutralize the acids that come thru by steam. You're not steaming much at 90 though.
I'd say you have a good successful unit. What are you driving? What is the output?
12-01-2008 07:29 PM
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