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Series vs Parallel
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Nick_Greyden Offline
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Post: #1
Series vs Parallel
So much knowledge, so little up front information :-)

So I have an electronics background. With this I understand series circuits, parallel circuits, and series parallel circuits. In so, the common rule is voltage drops in a series circuit and current drops in a parallel circuit. However, when there is talk of "I have them connected in series" or "connected in parallel" I don't know exactly WHAT is connected in what way. Could someone explain, or, better yet, draw a quick schematic of a cell connected in series and one in Parallel and give me the ups and downs of each.

About to break out with my first design (have just about decided to do follow a smack's design) and this is one item of research I can't find any info on.

Also, if anyone has done one of these on a Dodge Interpid, could they tell me where they fitted the gen as finding room in the engine compartment is becoming difficult for me as the gaps I can see to throw this thing fit right near the exhaust i.e. a whole lot of heat.
06-30-2008 11:06 PM
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jksav7 Offline
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Post: #2
RE: Series vs Parallel
I'll leave the schematics to someone else that knows how to do that. As far as the Intrepid goes, I remember that there's a person on this forum who goes by the name Zeek. He has an Intrepid with a Smack booster, if I recall. Do a search for that.


Here's a simple Bob Boyce explanation for a series cell: http://www.fuel-saver.org/showthread.php?tid=466
(This post was last modified: 07-01-2008 04:14 AM by jksav7.)
07-01-2008 04:02 AM
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Nick_Greyden Offline
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Post: #3
RE: Series vs Parallel
Thanks for the reply, but not excatly what I was looking for. I had already read that and understand that those were series and parallel circuits (one would drop voltage over the cells, one would drop current over the cells) but the word series once again was used without making much sense. One cell in series, then multipule cells in series. The first dropped voltage, while the second dropped current because Voltage is constant in parallel and current is constant in Series.

I'm curious if the words are being used correctly, or if I'm missing a key piece of information somewhere. BTW the formula for those that are curious is Voltage = Current X Resistance or V=IR for wattage is Power = Current X Voltage or P=IV

Edit: A couple of pics I have drawn to get the idea across for anyone that is lost.

[Image: secirrz7.png]
[Image: parcirnn7.png]

Edit 2: In the parallel circuit I have drawn I am also a retard. It's a 10V circuit and it would be at 10mA as the total resistance of the circuit is 1Kohms. Thus the current drop over each resistor (or load) would be 5mA. That and I don't feel like re-drawing it as I've gotta get ready for work :-)
(This post was last modified: 07-01-2008 08:05 AM by Nick_Greyden.)
07-01-2008 07:54 AM
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tjh566 Offline
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Post: #4
RE: Series vs Parallel
I think I may be able to help, maybe not a picture but a good description.

First off they are referring to a "cell" as 2 plates in a bath of water and electrolyte. Just call one plate Positive and the other negative, now in a series generator there are multiple cells wired in a "string" or in series with one another, Bring 12volts in on one + and leave that cell from the - and take it to the + of the next and so on. This drops the voltage down because in order to do the process of making browns gas you only need less than 2 volts. So if you have 7 cells wired in series on a cars 14volt charging system you get 2 volts to each cell

For a parallel wired generator you put all the + together and all the - together creating your parallel circuit, each cell gets 12 volts and the amperage is divided between them as you know.

In building generators we like to use a series design because it keeps the voltage lower per cell reducing heat, the extra voltage that isn't needed for the process just creates excess heat.

That being said in a series design you need each cell isolated from one another including the water because if they are all in a common bath voltage will leak around through the water.

Hope that helps!
07-01-2008 02:36 PM
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stevekos7 Offline
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Post: #5
RE: Series vs Parallel
So what happens when you introduce neutral plates? If you have a configuration -NN+NN- in theory you have two cells (fed from the single + to the two -'s). But what happens to the voltage and current equation then as the current passes through the neutral plates? I have just gone from a 4 plate parallel setup (which overheated badly with poor gas production) to a 7 plate setup as described above. It stays cooler and produces more gas, but I don't fully understand why. I would like to know the effect of the neutrals before I go and buy more SS and make more plates.

The smack setup is different again as I understand it, because you have a series setup, but in an open bath, which is contradicting your advice re separating the cells.

Comments?
07-01-2008 04:43 PM
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colchiro Offline
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Post: #6
RE: Series vs Parallel
Steve, keep that cell as-is and build another one. The one you have will work pretty good on 6 volts so make a second identical cell and connect them in series (or drop out a neutral from each side and make 3 cells with 4 volts on each). The more containers you have, your efficiency goes up a lot.

Rick

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07-01-2008 04:57 PM
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Nick_Greyden Offline
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Post: #7
RE: Series vs Parallel
tjh566

excellent describtion and EXACTLY what I was looking for. Thank you very much.
07-01-2008 07:02 PM
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Fatman1 Offline
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Post: #8
RE: Series vs Parallel
tjh566 Wrote:I think I may be able to help, maybe not a picture but a good description.

First off they are referring to a "cell" as 2 plates in a bath of water and electrolyte. Just call one plate Positive and the other negative, now in a series generator there are multiple cells wired in a "string" or in series with one another, Bring 12volts in on one + and leave that cell from the - and take it to the + of the next and so on. This drops the voltage down because in order to do the process of making browns gas you only need less than 2 volts. So if you have 7 cells wired in series on a cars 14volt charging system you get 2 volts to each cell

For a parallel wired generator you put all the + together and all the - together creating your parallel circuit, each cell gets 12 volts and the amperage is divided between them as you know.

In building generators we like to use a series design because it keeps the voltage lower per cell reducing heat, the extra voltage that isn't needed for the process just creates excess heat.

That being said in a series design you need each cell isolated from one another including the water because if they are all in a common bath voltage will leak around through the water.

Hope that helps!


I'm lost, is it 1.4 or 2.8?????????????


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(This post was last modified: 07-09-2008 07:14 AM by Fatman1.)
07-09-2008 07:12 AM
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dirty273 Offline
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Post: #9
RE: Series vs Parallel
Your math is correct on both.

But, I think the answer you need is 14 volts / 5 cells =2.8 volts per cell.

Each cell is made up of (3) plates. You still only have 5 cells. Think of each cell as Light bulbs. Each draws voltage out of the system but uses the same amount of amperage.

5 Cell Series
NaOH electrolyte
3.5" X 5" Electrodes
07-09-2008 08:04 AM
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stevekos7 Offline
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Post: #10
RE: Series vs Parallel
colchiro Wrote:Steve, keep that cell as-is and build another one. The one you have will work pretty good on 6 volts so make a second identical cell and connect them in series (or drop out a neutral from each side and make 3 cells with 4 volts on each). The more containers you have, your efficiency goes up a lot.

Thanks for the advice. It confirms what I had decided to do after trialling another poor setup. I will produce 3 cells in true sealed series +nn- each. This way I can fully utilize the 12 plates I have available. From what I can make out this should be effective with 4 volts for each cell. I'll try it this weekend and see what happens.
(This post was last modified: 07-09-2008 04:38 PM by stevekos7.)
07-09-2008 04:37 PM
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