Post Reply 
 
Thread Rating:
  • 0 Votes - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Super Charged Booster?
Author Message
BroBob1 Offline
Member
***

Posts: 66
Joined: May 2008
Reputation: 0
Post: #1
Super Charged Booster?
A fellow worker built a Smack style booster and he was not to impressed with the HHO production, so he re arranged the configuration and it looked like this:

+- -+ +- -+ and he said the production quadrupledShocked

1st plate positive, 1.5mm nylon washer, 2nd negative, SS jam nut, 3rd negative, 1.5mm nylon washer, 4th positive, SS jam nut, 5th positive 1.5mm nylon washer, 6th negative, SS jam nut, 7th negative 1.5mm nylon washer, 8th positive. He said he came up with this, but I would think someone else has done this before? Anyway, he was pretty excited!Big Grin I wonder if this is considered a "Series Cell"?

Does anyone know if the jam nut spacing is critical? Or can that be less of a gap?Hmm
(This post was last modified: 05-20-2008 07:29 PM by BroBob1.)
05-20-2008 07:28 PM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
bandit354 Offline
Member
***

Posts: 107
Joined: Mar 2008
Reputation: 0
Post: #2
RE: Super Charged Booster?
Some people say having two plates with the same polarity next to each other is a bad thing, but if it works it works. I use two nylon washers for my spacing.
05-20-2008 07:31 PM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
jksav7 Offline
Senior Member
****

Posts: 444
Joined: Apr 2008
Reputation: 0
Post: #3
RE: Super Charged Booster?
I'm sure it did produce gas like gangbusters. However, it will also overheat in a flash, as there is so much current leakage in a design like that.


BroBob1 Wrote:A fellow worker built a Smack style booster and he was not to impressed with the HHO production, so he re arranged the configuration and it looked like this:

+- -+ +- -+ and he said the production quadrupledShocked

1st plate positive, 1.5mm nylon washer, 2nd negative, SS jam nut, 3rd negative, 1.5mm nylon washer, 4th positive, SS jam nut, 5th positive 1.5mm nylon washer, 6th negative, SS jam nut, 7th negative 1.5mm nylon washer, 8th positive. He said he came up with this, but I would think someone else has done this before? Anyway, he was pretty excited!Big Grin I wonder if this is considered a "Series Cell"?

Does anyone know if the jam nut spacing is critical? Or can that be less of a gap?Hmm
05-20-2008 08:57 PM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
BroBob1 Offline
Member
***

Posts: 66
Joined: May 2008
Reputation: 0
Post: #4
RE: Super Charged Booster?
jksav7

Would you recommend sticking with something like the Smack Booster design, or do you know of some other configuration that you could recommend for us new studentsBlush
05-21-2008 04:19 AM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
jksav7 Offline
Senior Member
****

Posts: 444
Joined: Apr 2008
Reputation: 0
Post: #5
RE: Super Charged Booster?
For a "poor man's" series cell arrangement in a pvc/abs tube, like most of us do, the Smack booster has been found by the Smack himself to be the most efficient way to go. Although there are still tremendous current leaks, they are minimized. His step-gap design is what does this. So, I would suggest you build the Smack booster.


BroBob1 Wrote:jksav7

Would you recommend sticking with something like the Smack Booster design, or do you know of some other configuration that you could recommend for us new studentsBlush
05-21-2008 08:20 AM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
96lt4c4 Offline
Member
***

Posts: 1
Joined: Jun 2008
Reputation: 0
Post: #6
RE: Super Charged Booster?
jksav7 Wrote:I'm sure it did produce gas like gangbusters. However, it will also overheat in a flash, as there is so much current leakage in a design like that.


BroBob1 Wrote:A fellow worker built a Smack style booster and he was not to impressed with the HHO production, so he re arranged the configuration and it looked like this:

+- -+ +- -+ and he said the production quadrupledShocked

1st plate positive, 1.5mm nylon washer, 2nd negative, SS jam nut, 3rd negative, 1.5mm nylon washer, 4th positive, SS jam nut, 5th positive 1.5mm nylon washer, 6th negative, SS jam nut, 7th negative 1.5mm nylon washer, 8th positive. He said he came up with this, but I would think someone else has done this before? Anyway, he was pretty excited!Big Grin I wonder if this is considered a "Series Cell"?

Does anyone know if the jam nut spacing is critical? Or can that be less of a gap?Hmm

Hi guys new here. What if you used this arangment with a PWM to dial in the current to keep the unit from over heating.

I am getting ready to build a smack unit. I was planning on using a PWM to help with overheating.
(This post was last modified: 06-02-2008 11:15 AM by 96lt4c4.)
06-02-2008 11:14 AM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
ghahai ghato Offline
Member
***

Posts: 163
Joined: Apr 2008
Reputation: 3
Post: #7
RE: Super Charged Booster?
hi...
I've done this design once... 15 plates with 4mm spacing.... the results;
gas production was a BOOM, actually loud scary hisssing sound from very little electrolite and LOTS of heat that burn wires...Shocked
06-02-2008 08:45 PM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
retmil46 Offline
Member
***

Posts: 52
Joined: May 2008
Reputation: 0
Post: #8
RE: Super Charged Booster?
Comparing the Smack design with what's in the Hyzor book, it looks like with the Smack design there's so many current leakage paths that it basically ends up being a hot water heater.

In the Hyzor book, the plates are seated in teflon or other insulating material on the sides and bottom, and electrolyte level is kept 1" BELOW the tops of the plates. Small holes are drilled in alternating locations at the bottom of the plates to allow electrolyte to flow in as it boils off and refill the cells.

In other words, all possible leakage paths have been eliminated or minimized - the only path current can take is thru the cells themselves, unless you overfill the unit above the tops of the plates.

In the Smack design, the plates are completely submerged and open on all sides to the electrolyte. Plus, where the main electrical connections are made at the plates, these are also open to the surrounding electrolyte and have a available current path between most positive and most negative, completely bypassing the cells.

Looking at some of the other designs out there now, and comparing them with the info in the Hyzor book, I'm beginning to understand why most of them draw 20 amps or even more - they're having to dump extra amps into them to overcome all the current leakage paths and force current thru the cells to achieve any gas production, heating up the water in the process.

Mitchell Oates
Mooresville NC
'87 MB 300D Turbodiesel
'05 Jeep Liberty CRD (Common Rail Diesel)
06-03-2008 10:05 AM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
Post Reply 


Forum Jump:


User(s) browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)