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Using dissimiliar metals as an advantage
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cjpeaceful Offline
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Using dissimiliar metals as an advantage
I know this sounds strange but if you think about it, during electrolysis, the results of the process are dictated by a few factors. The most important being (1) type of material used for the electrodes and (2) the type of electrolyte one uses in their solution mix. Agreed?

So, aside from everything else (i.e., plate spacing, amperage, voltage, solution volume, etc.), what if we took the approach of using these (2) in varying combinations to produce the H2 gas only (or, at least as pure as we can physically muster based on our personal skills)?

I posted a video some time ago on You Tube about using stainless steel and mild steel (Mystery Metal) and the effects created during electrolysis. Needless to say I had many questions after conducting the experiment. Then, it dawned on me. Maybe this is why MIT is using this approach rather than trying to separate the two gases during the electrolysis process (search MIT; http://web.mit.edu/newsoffice/2008/oxygen-0731.html).

Could we be going about this all wrong?

Does this mean we may have to settle for more corrosive materials? Do we need to re-think everything we have been doing for the past few decades?

Just some thoughts.
10-22-2008 01:19 PM
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jjb2888 Offline
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Post: #2
RE: Using dissimiliar metals as an advantage
cjpeaceful Wrote:I know this sounds strange but if you think about it, during electrolysis, the results of the process are dictated by a few factors. The most important being (1) type of material used for the electrodes and (2) the type of electrolyte one uses in their solution mix. Agreed?

So, aside from everything else (i.e., plate spacing, amperage, voltage, solution volume, etc.), what if we took the approach of using these (2) in varying combinations to produce the H2 gas only (or, at least as pure as we can physically muster based on our personal skills)?

I posted a video some time ago on You Tube about using stainless steel and mild steel (Mystery Metal) and the effects created during electrolysis. Needless to say I had many questions after conducting the experiment. Then, it dawned on me. Maybe this is why MIT is using this approach rather than trying to separate the two gases during the electrolysis process (search MIT; http://web.mit.edu/newsoffice/2008/oxygen-0731.html).

Could we be going about this all wrong?

Does this mean we may have to settle for more corrosive materials? Do we need to re-think everything we have been doing for the past few decades?

Just some thoughts.

Saw this some time before. What we are doing is the old fashioned way. MIT's method is good but very costly for us. I am not sure of what volumes they put out either.
10-22-2008 04:11 PM
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cjpeaceful Offline
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RE: Using dissimiliar metals as an advantage
Agree.

I think it's possible to use "common" materials to achieve what we are doing but maybe unconventional common material. Like maybe mild steel or vinegar or copper, etc.

True, anything other than stainless steel will corrode quickly (or not) but these materials should not be disguarded either. Or, at least not yet.

I plan on replicating my posted video but this time I want to run the test for several hours at differing solution concentrations, different types of acids and maybe try some different plate spacing. The steel will probably disscolor again but if this disscoloration does not effect the solution (i.e, gunk it up), I may try one of these approaches with my next H2 only design. While I need to account for plate replacements, sure, but I don't think it's going to be as bad as we think.
10-23-2008 10:13 AM
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finallyME Offline
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Post: #4
RE: Using dissimiliar metals as an advantage
cjpeaceful Wrote:Agree.

I think it's possible to use "common" materials to achieve what we are doing but maybe unconventional common material. Like maybe mild steel or vinegar or copper, etc.

True, anything other than stainless steel will corrode quickly (or not) but these materials should not be disguarded either. Or, at least not yet.

I plan on replicating my posted video but this time I want to run the test for several hours at differing solution concentrations, different types of acids and maybe try some different plate spacing. The steel will probably disscolor again but if this disscoloration does not effect the solution (i.e, gunk it up), I may try one of these approaches with my next H2 only design. While I need to account for plate replacements, sure, but I don't think it's going to be as bad as we think.

You want your anode (O2 side) to be very corrosive resistant. The cathode could be copper if you want.

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10-28-2008 11:37 AM
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cjpeaceful Offline
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RE: Using dissimiliar metals as an advantage
True.

It wasn't until after I actually posted the video where I noticed I had wired up the "cell" just as you mentioned. Wink
10-29-2008 09:52 AM
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pfai Offline
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Post: #6
RE: Using dissimiliar metals as an advantage
I have gotten gas separation,now I have pure o2 and water together on stainless plate producing lots of oxidation. What kinda plate can we use that is very conductive while being noncorrosive? Graphite? Galvanized?
Paul
11-03-2008 02:49 PM
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walt2008 Offline
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Post: #7
RE: Using dissimiliar metals as an advantage
Hi Paul;

The coating on Galvanized steel is Zinc. Zinc is used because it will corrode and by doing so protects the underlying steel.
Graphite might work, but remember it is carbon and is likely to have a fairly high resistance.
Gold, Silver and Platinum will work, but they are expensive.

If the stainless steel you are using is not 302, 304 or 316, try replacing the plate that is oxidizing with one of the previously mentioned grades of stainless.
11-03-2008 04:38 PM
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pfai Offline
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RE: Using dissimiliar metals as an advantage
Has anyone tried lead as the o2 plate? Used in batteries.Lead is used in solder.
Paul
11-04-2008 01:56 PM
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finallyME Offline
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Post: #9
RE: Using dissimiliar metals as an advantage
pfai Wrote:Has anyone tried lead as the o2 plate? Used in batteries.Lead is used in solder.
Paul

Try nickel. It works better than any stainless, and is cheaper than Platinum.

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11-06-2008 01:38 PM
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alpha-dog Offline
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Post: #10
RE: Using dissimiliar metals as an advantage
Have you ever thought about coating your electrode with something. I have this corrosion preventative called "1st step" that puts a layer of corrosion on metal, converting the metal. Thats kinda what happens with stainless steel the chromium prevents corrosion. I used 1st step when rebuilding my 42 chevy and its great for that. Maybe it or something like it could be used in electrolysis.
Russ
11-06-2008 02:38 PM
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