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What about 24 volts?
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Cudaman Offline
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Post: #1
What about 24 volts?
I have a diesel with dual batteries. With a couple of diodes could I run a cell with 24 volts? Anyone try this? A guy looking at my set-up tonight asked me and it sounded feasible but he did not think about the isolation issue and the brain power is getting too low tonight to think about it so I thought I would throw it out to all the brains out there.
Great site by the way.Smile
09-17-2008 05:44 PM
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colchiro Offline
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Post: #2
RE: What about 24 volts?
Just wire a couple cells in series to 24 volts. In theory you could wire to just one battery, but you'll probably need more hho than just one cell can produce any way.

Rick

Links: Documents / Tuning for Mileage | Toyota Sensors | Autoshop Sensor Tutorials
09-17-2008 06:05 PM
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JonnyBravo Offline
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RE: What about 24 volts?
Since it's accepted that the best voltage across each cell (plate to plate) is 2-3 volts, it makes no difference what your source voltage is - for the 24v system, you'll just need twice as many cells in series as you would with a 12v system to maintain the 2-3 volt/cell design. However, if you're not following this design, the I'm sure doubling the voltage across the cell will increase output of HHO, and tons of heat at the same time.

Also, I don't quite know what you mean about running "a couple of diodes" to run a cell on 24v. Since car electrical systems are DC power, I don't see how the diodes would be useful for much of anything. To get 24v, you simply run the 2 batteries in series. Just to be clear, your diesel truck isn't running a 24v system. It's running the 2 batteries in parallel to boost the amperage output for the starter, because diesels take a lot of power to turn over due to the high compression. But you still *could* wire up your cell to be 24v while the rest of the electrical system remains the same at 12v.

'94 Ford Explorer 4.0L - Fargo, ND
(This post was last modified: 09-17-2008 08:42 PM by JonnyBravo.)
09-17-2008 08:41 PM
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Cudaman Offline
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RE: What about 24 volts?
JonnyBravo,

I think you are close to understanding what I'm thinking but if I run the two batteries in a series then the truck will be working on 24 volts, not good. Thought maybe a couple of diodes would isolate the 2 batteries wired in series at the cell from the truck that is wired in parrallel and still be able to charge the batteries with the alt. and run everything else on the truck with standard 12 volts.
I have used diodes before when installing remote starters and I just have not sat down and thought about how to do it.
My thinking is adding more plates to the 18 I have now and get more output with the same amps in the same cell running 24 volts. I did have 21 plates but the voltage drop was too great so I backed off to 6 sets of 3 plates (18 total) and it works great without heating up. Guess I'm looking for the next level. Hope someone that knows more about electronics then me can answer this. Please tell me if I'm barking up the wrong treeConfused
That guy Bob Boyce (think that is right) ran high volts with 101 plates? I read he converted 12V DC to 110AC and then back to high voltage DC, or something like that. Thanks everyone for any input.
09-18-2008 03:44 AM
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JonnyBravo Offline
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Post: #5
RE: What about 24 volts?
Cudaman Wrote:JonnyBravo,

I think you are close to understanding what I'm thinking but if I run the two batteries in a series then the truck will be working on 24 volts, not good. Thought maybe a couple of diodes would isolate the 2 batteries wired in series at the cell from the truck that is wired in parrallel and still be able to charge the batteries with the alt. and run everything else on the truck with standard 12 volts.
I have used diodes before when installing remote starters and I just have not sat down and thought about how to do it.
My thinking is adding more plates to the 18 I have now and get more output with the same amps in the same cell running 24 volts. I did have 21 plates but the voltage drop was too great so I backed off to 6 sets of 3 plates (18 total) and it works great without heating up. Guess I'm looking for the next level. Hope someone that knows more about electronics then me can answer this. Please tell me if I'm barking up the wrong treeConfused
That guy Bob Boyce (think that is right) ran high volts with 101 plates? I read he converted 12V DC to 110AC and then back to high voltage DC, or something like that. Thanks everyone for any input.

Ya, you're right... after thinking about it for a while, I concluded that you can't run two complete systems, one 12v and one 24v, from the same two batteries. This is due because the 24v system would connect a positive of one battery to the negative of the second battery, which would basically be a short in the 12v configuration because both positives are connected together. So in essence, it would be connecting the positive and negative of the same battery together - not good! Big Grin

I still can't figure out how diodes could solve this problem, however. I still think it's not a possibility due to the way it's wired. But I would like to follow you some more on this idea - maybe a simple drawing of how you plan on doing this would be great...

'94 Ford Explorer 4.0L - Fargo, ND
09-18-2008 12:09 PM
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Cudaman Offline
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Post: #6
RE: What about 24 volts?
The way I understand that a diode works is it only allows current to travel in one direction and maybe not allow the 24 volt current go back to the other battery. I'll give it some thought tonight and maybe draw something up.
09-18-2008 12:55 PM
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howiemandel Offline
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Post: #7
RE: What about 24 volts?
test it out, let us know, so we can now. Smile
YOu tube it, i know for a fact i seen tons of stuff on higher energy things like this.
09-18-2008 01:48 PM
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PanamaRik Offline
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Post: #8
RE: What about 24 volts?
Why not run 2 independent cells......... one from each battery.

That way you could set it up with a throttle controlled switch so only one is working at tickover, with the other coming into play when needed.

PanamaRik

Drop by my site at http://gassaver.panamacentric.com and say 'Hi' Rik
09-18-2008 02:05 PM
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howiemandel Offline
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RE: What about 24 volts?
WOW what a cool idea panama........sorta like a PWM only, instead of off on, it only zaps one, offf, then zaps the other.
Super idea.
09-18-2008 02:40 PM
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colchiro Offline
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Post: #10
RE: What about 24 volts?
It's hard enough to work with 12 volts since, like Jonny said, we want 2-3 volts per set of plates. I think working with 24 volts is asking for trouble. An efficient cell runs about 10 amp in a small car to maybe 20 amps for a truck. I see no advantage to using 24 volts.

Rick

Links: Documents / Tuning for Mileage | Toyota Sensors | Autoshop Sensor Tutorials
(This post was last modified: 09-18-2008 06:29 PM by colchiro.)
09-18-2008 02:56 PM
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