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does a caterpillar have a map/maf sensor?
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77 chevy k30 Offline
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does a caterpillar have a map/maf sensor?
I have a 2000 14.4liter caterpillar engine and im trying to research what i need to put together a hho system. does it have a map/maf senor?

acording to some sights a diesel should have one, but most sites refer to light duty trucks, this is a semi.

browngas.com says 0.5lpm per engine liter. 14.4liter engine=7.2lpm.
10-17-2009 03:51 AM
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Smudge Offline
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RE: does a caterpillar have a map/maf sensor?
Ok, that's 0.5lpm naturally aspirated which is under some vacuum at all times.
Your cat runs at 18 or higher psi continually, some new cats run 2 turbos in series for roughly 50 psi.
Your cat sucks as much air as if it were a 32L naturally aspirated engine.
Does that mean you need 16lpm of gas? That's a second alternator's worth of amps.
10-17-2009 09:18 AM
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77 chevy k30 Offline
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RE: does a caterpillar have a map/maf sensor?
Ok, now were talking shop. I only have a single turbo. As far as the max boost my truck never came with boost gauge. How do u figure how many liters a engine is based on boost pressure? i would guess then i need 16 liters a min then. does anyone else seem to have any insight on this subject how about this guy mike that runs this sight? Marchlabs/hybridconversions/allhho.com all the same peopleand kits, quoted me there new S dry cell 30-40 lpm kit with pwm and flow pump and all other stuff @30-40 amps. and suppossedly gauranteeing 42% increase in MPG. I saw onof the youtube videos were the mnufacturer(hybrid conversions) was bein used by the city in wisconsin. the local news ws interviewing the city employees. anyone herd ofthese guys and any positi or negative feedback?




(10-17-2009 09:18 AM)Smudge Wrote:  Ok, that's 0.5lpm naturally aspirated which is under some vacuum at all times.
Your cat runs at 18 or higher psi continually, some new cats run 2 turbos in series for roughly 50 psi.
Your cat sucks as much air as if it were a 32L naturally aspirated engine.
Does that mean you need 16lpm of gas? That's a second alternator's worth of amps.
(This post was last modified: 10-18-2009 06:57 AM by 77 chevy k30.)
10-18-2009 06:56 AM
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JET USA Offline
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RE: does a caterpillar have a map/maf sensor?
Hi. I am interested in seeing the results. I do not have the experience with the big diesels but a friend wanted to try 2 cells on a diesel car. We built two cells and installed them. I haven't gotten any report back about any problems. (He replaced 3 of the "water for Gas" type cells) That (WforG) failed due to overheating. He had them connected in parallel, which I advised him against (after the fact, I might add). [2 volts per cell space is closer to ideal]

Long story short is that we are learning more all the time. How much hho is needed? I don't know. But I can imagine that it is considerably less than you might think. As for the o2 and MAF or Map
sensors on a diesel. I don't know. I never heard of any. I will be checking for your reply.
Thanks, JT

http://Jet-USA.com
"Those who say" " It cannot be done"
"should get out of the way of those who are doing it"[/size][/align]
(This post was last modified: 10-18-2009 02:55 PM by JET USA.)
10-18-2009 02:52 PM
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Smudge Offline
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RE: does a caterpillar have a map/maf sensor?
ok, just in case you misread, I did not say that you need 16LPM of gas, I'm just wondering out loud. For all I know that could either eat your engine, or be enough gas to really make a significant difference on your fuel cost per mile in your cat which is probably over $0.46 .
Please report your fuel economy on your cat. If diesel is $2.80 a gallon and you're getting 6 mpg and 100,000 miles per year that means you spend $46,000.00 a year on diesel fuel. If you only get 0.5 mpg boost, you save yourself $3,000. If you get a 42% increase (holy cow) you'd be getting 8.52 mpg. If you manage that, come up to northern Michigan and carry away the load of bricks I create when you shave $14,000 off your fuel tab.

If you have a 3 liter gasoline engine with vacuum (due to a throttle), you have at most 2.8 liters of air enter the engine every 720 degrees of crank rotation. If you have a turbo running 14psi (ambient air pressure) then you have ~6 liters of air enter the engine every 720 degrees of crank rotation because you've doubled the air mass. This could mean a couple of things, that when your turbo boost is low, say idling, you at that moment need to have at most7LPM for your 0.5lpm per liter displacement ratio.
And that when you're climbing a hill and your boost goes up to 20psi, your cat could breathe possibly 20lpm of hh0. And all of my postulating is if you need or can handle 0.5 LPM of gas per liter of air displacement.
Please keep mind this is mostly armchair pundit postulating.

(10-18-2009 06:56 AM)77 chevy k30 Wrote:  Ok, now were talking shop. I only have a single turbo. As far as the max boost my truck never came with boost gauge. How do u figure how many liters a engine is based on boost pressure? i would guess then i need 16 liters a min then. does anyone else seem to have any insight on this subject how about this guy mike that runs this sight? all the same peopleand kits, quoted me there new S dry cell 30-40 lpm kit with pwm and flow pump and all other stuff @30-40 amps. and suppossedly gauranteeing 42% increase in MPG. I saw onof the youtube videos were the mnufacturer(hybrid conversions) was bein used by the city in wisconsin. the local news ws interviewing the city employees. anyone herd ofthese guys and any positi or negative feedback?




(10-17-2009 09:18 AM)Smudge Wrote:  Ok, that's 0.5lpm naturally aspirated which is under some vacuum at all times.
Your cat runs at 18 or higher psi continually, some new cats run 2 turbos in series for roughly 50 psi.
Your cat sucks as much air as if it were a 32L naturally aspirated engine.
Does that mean you need 16lpm of gas? That's a second alternator's worth of amps.
10-18-2009 04:45 PM
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AlexR Offline
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RE: does a caterpillar have a map/maf sensor?
(10-17-2009 03:51 AM)77 chevy k30 Wrote:  I have a 2000 14.4liter caterpillar engine and im trying to research what i need to put together a hho system. does it have a map/maf senor?

acording to some sights a diesel should have one, but most sites refer to light duty trucks, this is a semi.

browngas.com says 0.5lpm per engine liter. 14.4liter engine=7.2lpm.


I'd love to hear about the results on this also.

Alex

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http://www.cool-flame.com
11-15-2009 06:14 AM
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trknjim Offline
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Post: #7
RE: does a caterpillar have a map/maf sensor?
(10-18-2009 04:45 PM)Smudge Wrote:  ok, just in case you misread, I did not say that you need 16LPM of gas, I'm just wondering out loud. For all I know that could either eat your engine, or be enough gas to really make a significant difference on your fuel cost per mile in your cat which is probably over $0.46 .
Please report your fuel economy on your cat. If diesel is $2.80 a gallon and you're getting 6 mpg and 100,000 miles per year that means you spend $46,000.00 a year on diesel fuel. If you only get 0.5 mpg boost, you save yourself $3,000. If you get a 42% increase (holy cow) you'd be getting 8.52 mpg. If you manage that, come up to northern Michigan and carry away the load of bricks I create when you shave $14,000 off your fuel tab.

If you have a 3 liter gasoline engine with vacuum (due to a throttle), you have at most 2.8 liters of air enter the engine every 720 degrees of crank rotation. If you have a turbo running 14psi (ambient air pressure) then you have ~6 liters of air enter the engine every 720 degrees of crank rotation because you've doubled the air mass. This could mean a couple of things, that when your turbo boost is low, say idling, you at that moment need to have at most7LPM for your 0.5lpm per liter displacement ratio.
And that when you're climbing a hill and your boost goes up to 20psi, your cat could breathe possibly 20lpm of hh0. And all of my postulating is if you need or can handle 0.5 LPM of gas per liter of air displacement.
Please keep mind this is mostly armchair pundit postulating.

(10-18-2009 06:56 AM)77 chevy k30 Wrote:  Ok, now were talking shop. I only have a single turbo. As far as the max boost my truck never came with boost gauge. How do u figure how many liters a engine is based on boost pressure? i would guess then i need 16 liters a min then. does anyone else seem to have any insight on this subject how about this guy mike that runs this sight? all the same peopleand kits, quoted me there new S dry cell 30-40 lpm kit with pwm and flow pump and all other stuff @30-40 amps. and suppossedly gauranteeing 42% increase in MPG. I saw onof the youtube videos were the mnufacturer(hybrid conversions) was bein used by the city in wisconsin. the local news ws interviewing the city employees. anyone herd ofthese guys and any positi or negative feedback?




(10-17-2009 09:18 AM)Smudge Wrote:  Ok, that's 0.5lpm naturally aspirated which is under some vacuum at all times.
Your cat runs at 18 or higher psi continually, some new cats run 2 turbos in series for roughly 50 psi.
Your cat sucks as much air as if it were a 32L naturally aspirated engine.
Does that mean you need 16lpm of gas? That's a second alternator's worth of amps.

i have read someplace that 10lpm output should give you some gain on a semi. the trick is to play with the turbo pressure switch and some have turbo thermal switches as well. u have to trick the ECM into thinking it is NOT under load. Doesn't that make sense? I have been trying to find the site again but have had no luck. mine has 2 leads on the pressure switch. It is a '99 IH 9400 daycab with a Cummins N-14 455HP. I have just installed 3)23plate dry cell hydrolyzers I built myselfand went from 4.9mpg to 7.6mpg. Running deadhead has given me 8.7mpg. This is the highest mpg but loads and constant speed are a huge factor in semis !!! I run ea. unit @ 12amps and have an output about 2.5 to 3 lpm hho. I use a Bahr flow rate meter . I wonder if I would have to add resistance or boost current to the turbo pressure sensor? maybe analog trim pot w/ resistor as used on old o2 sensors? Hmmm? Any IDEAS ???
(10-17-2009 09:18 AM)Smudge Wrote:  Ok, that's 0.5lpm naturally aspirated which is under some vacuum at all times.
Your cat runs at 18 or higher psi continually, some new cats run 2 turbos in series for roughly 50 psi.
Your cat sucks as much air as if it were a 32L naturally aspirated engine.
Does that mean you need 16lpm of gas? That's a second alternator's worth of amps.

most semi alternators are rated @ 105 (idle) amps. topping @ 140-160amps Max output.
(This post was last modified: 08-14-2011 06:23 PM by trknjim.)
08-14-2011 05:36 PM
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