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hho gas to vacuum?
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hhotiom Offline
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Post: #1
hho gas to vacuum?
I am building a dry cell and i was wondering whether is should connect it to my intake manifold vacuum line and to my air intake, or just to my air intake?
01-19-2009 06:51 PM
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colchiro Offline
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Post: #2
RE: hho gas to vacuum?
Connecting to your air intake is easier and usually causes less problems. Too much vacuum and you can easily suck the entire contents of your cell into your engine where I doubt it'll do it much good. Also, it's easy to get a vacuum leak and lose power and throw CEL's. I generally recommend it only for advanced users who are comfortable under the hood. You do not want to use a brake line for a vacuum source and generally a pcv line is safer.

Try the air intake first.

Rick

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01-20-2009 04:16 PM
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homemader Offline
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Post: #3
RE: hho gas to vacuum?
If your cell have air intake than connect it both to the vacuum line and to the air intake. If not than connect it only to air intake.

Anyway my recommendation is to use a cell with air intake.

Hydrogen on demand system plans and drawings - The road to freedom.Shy
03-03-2009 03:33 AM
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JET USA Offline
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Post: #4
RE: hho gas to vacuum?
My recommendations:

To the Vacuum NO ; go to the air box just before the throttle valve.
Adding a air bleeder valve to introduce air to the cell. : NO
Further suggestions:
Air intake at the cell may allow electrolyte to be drawn into the engine.
this is not a desirable condition. The production of the cell will be sent to the bubbler then the flashback arrestor then the airbox. The volume of air flow will take all the hho that is produced. High vacuum is not needed or desired. Also Foaming may result from introduction of air.
I would suggest: Monitor the amps. Control the amps with a PWM.
metering can be accomplished with a shunt (resistor) and remote 75MV. meter.
Perhaps monitor the temperature at the top of the cell. The temp sensor may have to be coated (or shielded) to prevent etching via electrolsis erosion of the metal bulb. (the bulb is at ground potential)
Always use a relay to shut down with the engine off.
The bubbler may be a clear [plastic] tube with a small quantity of clean water in the bottom. (Not filled) to catch stray electrolyte and isolate the cell from the outlet stream of gas hoses. Glass bottles should not be used for safety. let's see is there anything else?
My site is http://waterworks4fuel.com

http://Jet-USA.com
"Those who say" " It cannot be done"
"should get out of the way of those who are doing it"[/size][/align]
(This post was last modified: 07-16-2009 11:18 PM by JET USA.)
07-16-2009 09:55 PM
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lucky55 Offline
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Post: #5
RE: hho gas to vacuum?
(01-19-2009 06:51 PM)hhotiom Wrote:  I am building a dry cell and i was wondering whether is should connect it to my intake manifold vacuum line and to my air intake, or just to my air intake?
sodium and potassium Hydroxide, absorb CO2 from the air and adds carbon to your HHO stream as does sodium biCARBONate (not good)
and a vacuum will only make water vaporize and that's not good either.
the vacuum ONLY makes it LOOK LIKE great production.
You'd need to regulate it if your putting it into your manifold or vacuum line. So the breather box is the easiest.
My expeirience with it was: i wound up with HHO in my intake manifold, when the engine backfired and blew the back off the power brake line at the booster.
07-17-2009 03:53 AM
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JET USA Offline
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Post: #6
RE: hho gas to vacuum?
PS: a comment about the NaOH and co2. If it is not kept in an air tight container (when dry), It will absorb co2 from the air. Once it is mixed into the water, It changes composition and the sodium acts as the catalyzer or conductive element in the water that causes it to be conductive. NaOH is a strong caustic "Base" but is the conductive element.
pps: To prevent the damger of explosion in the manifold, It is a good idea to have a relay to keep it off untill there is airflow in the intake manifold when the engine is running. Addition of a vacuum switch would be a good idea too.

http://Jet-USA.com
"Those who say" " It cannot be done"
"should get out of the way of those who are doing it"[/size][/align]
07-17-2009 12:54 PM
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