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how much KOH?
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diablo8109 Offline
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Post: #11
RE: how much KOH?
hello
I check my cells at least once a week to see how they are working. I can see inside my cell so I kind of go off the amount of HHO that is being produced if I do not need to add water. The way that I figured out what it should look like when the amount of KOH is good. Was took a picture of what the cell looked like when I cleaned them and had new water and KOH. Then I just would compared using the picture for the first few times now I just can tell. I also took note of the amps that I was drawing when the cell was clean and new water and KOH was used. If the amps go down but the water level is good just add alittle KOH. The trick is to not add to much use your amp gage to find out if you are under or over serviced. Also make sure the you use the reading when you cell is up to temp. Not when it is cold because the amps will go up until the cell gets staple.

Larry
Cutting Edge Water4Gas
10-12-2009 05:52 AM
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Nomar Martinez Offline
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Post: #12
RE: how much KOH?
Since I start to study the hho cell, no one explain the system in term of the Ohm'Law: V=I * R .
If we know the voltage, the current we can determined the impedance( and/or resistance) of the system. If we are testing with baking soda because is cheaper and we measure this R, then we can change what ever electrolite is better. I'm just make a point of view in electrical terms.
Now if we change to KOH and measure the amount that we add to distilled water and measured the resistance with a multimeter @ the same temparature as we normally use the baking soda, we will get close to our goal of the mixture that we are looking for. Tell me if I'm correct according to your experiences.
Nomar Martinez, Electrical Engineer
10-17-2009 11:42 AM
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hhoelectronics Offline
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Post: #13
RE: how much KOH?
(10-17-2009 11:42 AM)Nomar Martinez Wrote:  Now if we change to KOH and measure the amount that we add to distilled water and measured the resistance with a multimeter @ the same temparature as we normally use the baking soda, we will get close to our goal of the mixture that we are looking for. Tell me if I'm correct according to your experiences.
Nomar Martinez, Electrical Engineer

Because you are an Electrical Engineer, I can tell you that the cell has a diode characteristic. Changing the electrolyte will change the forward voltage (like Si versus Ge). Ohm's law apply only for linear loads. The cell has negative resistance in temperature.
The best (and easy) way is to use a constant current source and, at the desired temperature and current, to select the best electrolyte for maximum output. So far, from my experiments, KOH works the best, but it is dangerous to handle.

There are many variables in this system, but maximum efficiency is achieved at the highest temperature + minimum applied voltage + maximum practical surface + maximum concentration of the electrolyte + minimum open voltage for the electrolyte.

Current control is mandatory (with electronics or cooling systems).

With the multimeter you will not be able to start the cell.
(This post was last modified: 10-17-2009 04:32 PM by hhoelectronics.)
10-17-2009 04:20 PM
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JET USA Offline
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Post: #14
RE: how much KOH?
Hi. May I comment? Im not an "Engineer" by trade but I have studied electronic principles and knowledge since the 60's. I can tell you that it is not possible to take a reading of the resistance of the hydrolysis hho cell reliably.

That measurement can be calculated by using the observations of voltage applied and the amps measured. ohms law still applies to those calculations. In a dc circuit those parameters still work.

If you use an electronic circuit to regulate the current (like a PWM) Then the instantanous readings would still apply. The difference is that the time interval is the controlling factor by switching the current on and off at a high rate of speed and controlling the duty cycle. The curremt is effectively controlled overall

To answer the question (How much KOH?) Try adjusting the concentration for a maximum
current without the pwm effect first, then apply it for the control.

Thanks, JT

post script: Incidently The use of "baking soda" as an electrolyte is not recommended. It will attack the metals of the cell plates and it also gives off Co2 in the process. Why not use NaOH to start with, and avoid the problems associated with baking soda. The end result is that the electrolyte transformes to a sodium Hydroxide solution anyway.

http://Jet-USA.com
"Those who say" " It cannot be done"
"should get out of the way of those who are doing it"[/size][/align]
(This post was last modified: 10-18-2009 03:48 PM by JET USA.)
10-18-2009 03:32 PM
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