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oxygen sensors
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cheapfuel Offline
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Post: #1
oxygen sensors
Some useful info I found on oxygen sensors. Some of you might be interested in this http://www.kemparts.com/TechTalk/tt07.asp Also, has anyone tried a fixed voltage oxygen sensor. I understand that you can get oxygen sensors for some vehicles that do not fluctuate in voltage from 0 to 1 but remain at the same all the time (0.450 volts I think). For other vehicles there are universal types that do the same. Before I bought my EFIE I thought of getting one installed. Now I will use the EFIE instead. I wonder how this sensor would work with a EFIE. Anyone had any experience along these lines?
07-24-2008 08:20 AM
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rpatzer Offline
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RE: oxygen sensors
I don't see how a constant voltage will be the best signal. The fuel mix varies with load, temp, humidity etc, and the ECU needs to be able to respond to all variables resulting in the best "read" for the current condition. I think all the sensors need to vary according to the current situation.
All the EFIE is going to do is add a small increase in the current going to the ECU, making it seem a little richer, resulting in a slightly leaner mix.
The article was a good explanation of the workings of the O2 sensor.
07-24-2008 10:18 AM
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cheapfuel Offline
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RE: oxygen sensors
Thank you rpatzer. I agree and understand fully what you are saying. However, having said that, many have tried wrapping their sensors in tin foil to affect the sensor temperature and hence have it read higher. Why not replace it with a "dummy sensor" if that is what they want. I am not going to do it myself. Just a thought and wondering if any one has done that. Also has any one used the newer DEFIE instead of the EFIE? If so, any comments. I also understand that there are MAP adjustable enhancers. Any interesting information on them?
07-24-2008 01:33 PM
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rpatzer Offline
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RE: oxygen sensors
cheapfuel Wrote:Thank you rpatzer. I agree and understand fully what you are saying. However, having said that, many have tried wrapping their sensors in tin foil to affect the sensor temperature and hence have it read higher. Why not replace it with a "dummy sensor" if that is what they want. I am not going to do it myself. Just a thought and wondering if any one has done that. Also has any one used the newer DEFIE instead of the EFIE? If so, any comments. I also understand that there are MAP adjustable enhancers. Any interesting information on them?

Tin foil? Tin foil is not an insulator, it is a conductor. The sensor temp reaches 600F. Between the temp in the exhaust and the heated sensor, that is sufficient to keep the O2 sensor working. Don't forget, the O2 sensor, in my car at least, reaches working temp w/i 100ft/1-2 minutes of driving. The engine temp hasn't reached its full combustion temp yet (rad water isn't up to running temp) and yet, the O2 sensor still goes to closed loop ( it is operational). So most of the O2 sensor heat comes from its own heated element.

Also, don't forget, the sensor needs to breath to compare internal O2 /external O2. That is what determines the voltage sent to the ECU. Once O2 sensor operational temp has been reached, any additional wrappings are not needed. From that point on, it is not temp that determines the voltage sent, but rather the O2 ratio (internal v external).

If the tin foil theory had any validity, it would be in the first several minutes to hasten the desired sensor temp. From that point on, it would be useless.

I don't see a digital EFIE as having merit. It is merely a voltage passenger to the sensor voltage being sent to the ECU. The narrow band sensor is not that accurate, so no sense in the EFIE being real precise.
07-24-2008 02:59 PM
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Atom Offline
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Post: #5
RE: oxygen sensors
rpatzer Wrote:
cheapfuel Wrote:Thank you rpatzer. I agree and understand fully what you are saying. However, having said that, many have tried wrapping their sensors in tin foil to affect the sensor temperature and hence have it read higher. Why not replace it with a "dummy sensor" if that is what they want. I am not going to do it myself. Just a thought and wondering if any one has done that. Also has any one used the newer DEFIE instead of the EFIE? If so, any comments. I also understand that there are MAP adjustable enhancers. Any interesting information on them?

Tin foil? Tin foil is not an insulator, it is a conductor. The sensor temp reaches 600F. Between the temp in the exhaust and the heated sensor, that is sufficient to keep the O2 sensor working. Don't forget, the O2 sensor, in my car at least, reaches working temp w/i 100ft/1-2 minutes of driving. The engine temp hasn't reached its full combustion temp yet (rad water isn't up to running temp) and yet, the O2 sensor still goes to closed loop ( it is operational). So most of the O2 sensor heat comes from its own heated element.

Also, don't forget, the sensor needs to breath to compare internal O2 /external O2. That is what determines the voltage sent to the ECU. Once O2 sensor operational temp has been reached, any additional wrappings are not needed. From that point on, it is not temp that determines the voltage sent, but rather the O2 ratio (internal v external).

If the tin foil theory had any validity, it would be in the first several minutes to hasten the desired sensor temp. From that point on, it would be useless.

I don't see a digital EFIE as having merit. It is merely a voltage passenger to the sensor voltage being sent to the ECU. The narrow band sensor is not that accurate, so no sense in the EFIE being real precise.
Rpatzer you are correct, O2 sensors are not that propriotry, your fuel trim is looking at all the sensors,there for adding a small current with your EFIE won't change a thing on most vehicles. You will have to do other things to physically lean out the fuel such as maybe adding resistance to your MAp or MAF sensor or even goes as far as maybe adding some resistance to your fuel pump. Maybe some day soon there will be a company will have ECUs available that will take care of all these problems that us do it yourselfers.
(This post was last modified: 07-24-2008 04:50 PM by Atom.)
07-24-2008 04:48 PM
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