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plate configuration
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alscrimp Offline
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Post: #1
plate configuration
Hey guys,

I have a 9 plate setup (+nnn-nnn+) that runs extremely hot. After reading your forum, I think I understand the problem. Correct me if I am wrong: if I place more neutrals such as +nnnn-nnnn+ it would run cooler (thanks Mike). However, after reading your forum many people stated that each plate should not exceed 2 volts. So that would mean that I would have 5 plates which would equal 14/5=2.8 volts (2 volts = HHO and .8 volts = heat). Is this correct? Then it would behoove me to go with 2 extra neutrals such as +nnnnn-nnnnn+ which would equal 14/7=2 volts per plate. Now would a configuration like +nnnnn- work better than +nnnnn-nnnnn+? What would be the difference?

BTW ever heard of a "B-Cell"?
(This post was last modified: 11-05-2009 02:48 PM by alscrimp.)
11-05-2009 11:03 AM
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Smudge Offline
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Post: #2
RE: plate configuration
Wow, someone's planning their plates with voltage in mind!
I'm wondering why do any sort of "y" configuration with + - + configuration at all, just +nnnnn-

I'm dying to hear what a "B-Cell" is.
11-05-2009 03:53 PM
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colchiro Offline
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Post: #3
RE: plate configuration
You need to count the space between the plates, (or number of plates less one).

Also you should measure the voltage you currently have at your cell since it's common to lose a volt or two with wiring, relay, fuse, etc.

So 7 plates with 12 volts at the cell would give you about 2 volts (12/6) so you shouldn't use more than 7. Some people like a warmer cell and use 6.

Rick

Links: Documents / Tuning for Mileage | Toyota Sensors | Autoshop Sensor Tutorials
11-05-2009 04:18 PM
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alscrimp Offline
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Post: #4
RE: plate configuration
(11-05-2009 04:18 PM)colchiro Wrote:  You need to count the space between the plates, (or number of plates less one).

Also you should measure the voltage you currently have at your cell since it's common to lose a volt or two with wiring, relay, fuse, etc.

So 7 plates with 12 volts at the cell would give you about 2 volts (12/6) so you shouldn't use more than 7. Some people like a warmer cell and use 6.

OK, So I was on the right track with the voltage setup between the plates. I finally understand the plate configuration. Now what is the difference between -nnnnnn+ and -nnnnnn+nnnnnn-? I'm thinking the second one, being in parallel will make more gas. Will it make more gas or heat? Will this work for a dry cell too?
(11-05-2009 03:53 PM)Smudge Wrote:  Wow, someone's planning their plates with voltage in mind!
I'm wondering why do any sort of "y" configuration with + - + configuration at all, just +nnnnn-

I'm dying to hear what a "B-Cell" is.

Go to http://www.panaceauniversity.org/Bryan%2...20Cell.pdf for more info about the "B-Cell".
(This post was last modified: 11-06-2009 04:17 AM by alscrimp.)
11-06-2009 02:58 AM
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colchiro Offline
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Post: #5
RE: plate configuration
-nnnnnn+nnnnnn- is two of these in parallel: -nnnnnn+

Twice as many amps, gas and probably more heat, but that won't be a problem.

Works for anything, but a lot less heat in a dry cell, since it's a lot more efficient.

Rick

Links: Documents / Tuning for Mileage | Toyota Sensors | Autoshop Sensor Tutorials
(This post was last modified: 11-06-2009 04:31 AM by colchiro.)
11-06-2009 04:30 AM
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alscrimp Offline
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Post: #6
RE: plate configuration
(11-06-2009 04:30 AM)colchiro Wrote:  -nnnnnn+nnnnnn- is two of these in parallel: -nnnnnn+

Twice as many amps, gas and probably more heat, but that won't be a problem.

Works for anything, but a lot less heat in a dry cell, since it's a lot more efficient.

So a 9 plate setup (-nnnnnnn+) would be fine for a wet cell with 14 volts?
11-06-2009 08:06 AM
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colchiro Offline
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Post: #7
RE: plate configuration
9 plates in series means 8 cells (9-1).

If you truly have 14 volts at the cell (heavy wires and short run), that would be 14/8 or 1.75 volts per cell.

Some people complain about no output with 2 volts or less and need quite strong electrolytes get it to work.

My preference would be 7 or 8 plates (2.3-2.0 volts).

Rick

Links: Documents / Tuning for Mileage | Toyota Sensors | Autoshop Sensor Tutorials
(This post was last modified: 11-06-2009 11:25 AM by colchiro.)
11-06-2009 11:24 AM
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koya1893 Offline
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Post: #8
RE: plate configuration
(11-06-2009 04:30 AM)colchiro Wrote:  -nnnnnn+nnnnnn- is two of these in parallel: -nnnnnn+

Twice as many amps, gas and probably more heat, but that won't be a problem.

Works for anything, but a lot less heat in a dry cell, since it's a lot more efficient.

I tried that configuration for a dry cell, it required high voltage and barely produced any hydrogen. then I too the same set up and submerged it in a container with 1 tablespoon of KOH in 1/2 gl of water. the same thing high voltage but barely any bubbles.

When I returned the configuration like so: -nnn+nnn- the hydrogen was instant when submerged and the same when I enclose them as a dry cell. I must be doing something wrong with this configuration -nnnnnn+ because I cannot produce the same that. but this config I can run a torch with an 1 long flame -nnn+nnn-:
11-09-2009 10:28 AM
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colchiro Offline
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Post: #9
RE: plate configuration
Someone else can give you exact numbers but I bet you'd need more like 10 tablespoons per qt.

Like I said, more plates means a lot more KOH, but less heat and more efficient.

Rick

Links: Documents / Tuning for Mileage | Toyota Sensors | Autoshop Sensor Tutorials
11-09-2009 01:23 PM
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koya1893 Offline
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Post: #10
RE: plate configuration
(11-09-2009 01:23 PM)colchiro Wrote:  Someone else can give you exact numbers but I bet you'd need more like 10 tablespoons per qt.

Like I said, more plates means a lot more KOH, but less heat and more efficient.

I've been busy trying to master these EFIE so I can take advantage gas production from the cell everyone here help me put together. It was a bumpy road but after long deliveration I finally put together the cell suggested from this forun.
6 Cell 7 plates configuration -NNNNN+ .040 spacing, 2.3 volts a cell, 3"x11" plates. Two are installed on one of my test vehicle a 2003 Town Car with 4.6 liter engine. the last test run on mix driving which what my wife drives. the result were 26.8 mpg, that's a 48.8% gain from what it was rated at. 18mpg.
01-20-2010 04:45 AM
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