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pressure relief valve
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mtnhillsman Offline
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Post: #1
pressure relief valve
Has anybody run into the trouble of their HHO lines freezing?? Conensation constantly forms in the air line, which builds up enough to freeze and create a total blockage for me. I'm more prone to this since my air line runs under the car from my trunk, I've considered several options, heat tape, relocation of the cell, running the line inside the vehicle. The latter 2 wouldnt do much good since ultimately the line could freeze anyway, heat tape requiring power and a hefty price tag if you want it in 12v so you dont have to use an inverter.

It seems that no matter what I can come up with that condensation freezing could potentially always cause a blockage. As such i think safey measures should be considered, whether its from freezing or anything else.

I've been looking for a decent pressure relief valve that will allow the hho to vent outside the vehicle in the event of any blockage. They all seem to come with a $60+ price tag for a 10-15 psi relief valve.

I'm sure this is an issue for others, anybody have an easy solution to this??
(This post was last modified: 03-03-2009 08:05 PM by mtnhillsman.)
03-03-2009 07:56 PM
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benny Offline
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Post: #2
RE: pressure relief valve
(03-03-2009 07:56 PM)mtnhillsman Wrote:  Has anybody run into the trouble of their HHO lines freezing?? Conensation constantly forms in the air line, which builds up enough to freeze and create a total blockage for me. I'm more prone to this since my air line runs under the car from my trunk, I've considered several options, heat tape, relocation of the cell, running the line inside the vehicle. The latter 2 wouldnt do much good since ultimately the line could freeze anyway, heat tape requiring power and a hefty price tag if you want it in 12v so you dont have to use an inverter.

It seems that no matter what I can come up with that condensation freezing could potentially always cause a blockage. As such i think safey measures should be considered, whether its from freezing or anything else.

I've been looking for a decent pressure relief valve that will allow the hho to vent outside the vehicle in the event of any blockage. They all seem to come with a $60+ price tag for a 10-15 psi relief valve.

I'm sure this is an issue for others, anybody have an easy solution to this??

Instead of a relief valve, why not look at fitting a pressure switch, which should be incorporated so as to switch off a relay controlling power to your generator.
That way, your system will stop producing any HHO if there is any excessive increase in HHO pressure from the generator. This switch should be as close to your HHO outlet as possible so that it will detect an excessive pressure build up in your system for whatever reason.
Tee off from your HHO line to any pressure switch.

No need to vent off 'unwanted' HHO, and helps save on wasting power required for HHO production.

If you use an existing relay to enable/disable your generator system, eg for switching off system with engine stop, just place a normally closed pressure switch in series with the control line for this relay.
(This post was last modified: 03-04-2009 01:55 AM by benny.)
03-04-2009 01:52 AM
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mtnhillsman Offline
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Post: #3
RE: pressure relief valve
Good idea. In that case id be able to see it on my ammeter indicating the cell is off.

Thanks..
03-04-2009 06:43 AM
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mtnhillsman Offline
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Post: #4
RE: pressure relief valve
http://search.digikey.com/scripts/DkSear...80-2044-ND

Found one here for 28 dollars. Definitely the way to go.
03-04-2009 11:28 AM
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benny Offline
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Post: #5
RE: pressure relief valve
(03-04-2009 11:28 AM)mtnhillsman Wrote:  http://search.digikey.com/scripts/DkSear...80-2044-ND

Found one here for 28 dollars. Definitely the way to go.

Hokay. But before you rush out to buy this particular switch, check out washing machine pressure switches on the internet. The ones used to detect water level in the washing machine.

Some have multiple setpoints for different pressure levels. Depending on the operating pressure of your HHO system, usually no more that a couple of PSI, one of these might suffice. Cost pennies instead of pounds, and should be available at most white goods repair shops. Just make sure it is of the type with inbuilt switches, and not one of the variable type which attaches to a custom pcb.
(This post was last modified: 03-04-2009 01:27 PM by benny.)
03-04-2009 01:19 PM
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Gary Offline
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Post: #6
RE: pressure relief valve
I've been making stuff, that works to some degree:
[img][Image: Sales.jpg][/img]

[img][Image: ReliefGutz.jpg][/img]
03-04-2009 01:26 PM
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mtnhillsman Offline
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Post: #7
RE: pressure relief valve
oh well, already bought it. I was thinking the same thing though, something with even more sensitivity that would open the circuit at a few psi, im thinking that if the line becomes mildly frozen it would be good to have a little more pressure to push the ice through and possibly aid in melting.

I know my dry cell will handle 15 psi easily as for the bubbler who knows, might run into trouble there.
03-04-2009 01:39 PM
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Gary Offline
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Post: #8
RE: pressure relief valve
15 psi is a lot. Good sealing there.
The pressure switch had a vinyl rubber gasket for the diaphragm and it stretches out and stays connected. Bad thing. Cure is some light springs on the bolts to return it to stasis.
The pressure regulator/relief valve worked well, but was made of flotsam and jetsom from my bins and can't be duplicated.
03-04-2009 03:47 PM
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benny Offline
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Post: #9
RE: pressure relief valve
(03-04-2009 01:39 PM)mtnhillsman Wrote:  oh well, already bought it. I was thinking the same thing though, something with even more sensitivity that would open the circuit at a few psi, im thinking that if the line becomes mildly frozen it would be good to have a little more pressure to push the ice through and possibly aid in melting.

I know my dry cell will handle 15 psi easily as for the bubbler who knows, might run into trouble there.

I doubt that any pressure will push ice through your tubing, especially with plastic tubing. Remember that ice/water expands when frozen. You are most likely to have a plug formed in your piping, slightly bigger in diameter than the normal diameter of your plastic pipe. Similar with metal piping but, when cleared, metal piping tends to stay swelled out..

That said, if there is a path through the pipe for HHO, then heat generated in the cells(s) will heat the HHO generated. That will help keep the pipes clear of ice.

Best bet is to keep your pipes from freezing in the first place. Try, if possible, routing your pipe in such a manner that there are no loops hanging down where liquid can accumulate. Also, try to keep your piping system as short as possible.

Personally, I would run a metal pipe, possibly small bore copper, for the part underneath your car, and route it alongside, or very close to, the exhaust system. That way, even if you do get a blockage, there is a good chance it will clear itself (heat from the exhaust) after a short run of the engine. Note there is less chance of the pipe splitting due to freezing if you use copper, rather than steel, piping
(This post was last modified: 03-05-2009 09:26 AM by benny.)
03-05-2009 09:18 AM
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domsmith Offline
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Post: #10
Smile RE: pressure relief valve
I too agree with you that the post is very nice and useful related to the relief valve. I will definitely look forward to it. It's a great resource.
______________
Have a look at tire valve stem caps | strain relief bushing .
06-29-2012 09:22 PM
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