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seperate batteries fo hho plug in hybrid
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apterafan Offline
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Post: #1
seperate batteries fo hho plug in hybrid
hi new to this forum so bear with me ,i[/font][/size] own a 1993 single cab v6 3.0 with a five speed and camper shell . seriously thinking of adding a couple of deep cycle batteries to run the hho and make my own hho hybrid by plugging it into the wall , i live on a small island and do a lot of short trips so i should be able to have enough amp hours with 2 optimas deeep cycles for all my trips , can anyone smart out there add up some numbers ? with the extra weight of 2 optimas (about 130 pounds) and about a 5% gain in overall vehicle weight but absolutely no alternator draw (just plugging in to the house when parked to charge) could this be any more efficient than the norm if so what kind of numbers? thanks for any help
09-22-2009 04:32 AM
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biggy boy Offline
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RE: seperate batteries fo hho plug in hybrid
Hi there!
I'm working on the same setup in the back of my pickup a couple of batterys, charge them at home at night and drive to work and back. The battries would be used to run the HHO gen Dry cell 18 plate (3) six cells in parelel.

Any way her is the post I have from another forum on my findings for the cost to charge a very large battery from a wall outlet.

Ok I did a test with one of the big batteries I’m planning on using to run my HHO gen.

The battery is an Exide Commercial Premium Heavy Duty. I have four of these.
Model F-4DLT

I hooked up two headlight bulbs to the test battery and ran the cells down to 4 Volts under load.
Disconnected the load and let it sit for 15 minutes to rebound
Back up. The battery rebounded back to 10.72 volts under NO load.
I then hooked up my 120 volt charger and set it for 10 amp charge setting.
Using a fluke clamp on meter to read the amp draw to the battery and a fluke bench tester to monitor the batteries voltage.
The charger was plugged into my new KWh meter.
At the 2 hour mark the battery was drawing 7.4 amps, On the low voltage side.
The charger was drawing 1.4 amps at 120 volts.

Here are the final recharge results:
Charge time 13 hours 12 minutes
Starting amperage DC 10amps
Max amps at start up 120volt 1.78amps
Max Watts at start up 120volt 187
Total KWh 1.62
My cost here in Ontario @$0.059 per KWh, this is average.
Non peak is $0.042
Peak is $0.076 average = $0.059
Total cost to charge battery = 9 cents
These numbers are direct read off from the KWh meter, that the charger is plugged into.

Man I need to get a better charger the 10 amp deal is too small.
This one is old and very basic not even an automatic.
I'm looking at getting one of the electronic pulse chargeres does up to 20 amps down to 2 amp trickle.

Glen

2001 GMC Sierra 4.8
09-22-2009 06:32 AM
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apterafan Offline
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Post: #3
RE: seperate batteries fo hho plug in hybrid
wow thanks glen you just exemplified what forumus are for , you seem to be pretty good with those math numbers , i know that plug in energy is way more efficient than i.c.e energy as it is created by about the same efficiencies as those big diesel electric trains wich is about 400 mpg when
comparing the relative power rate ratios to an automobile we could go on about why that is (but that is a whole nother forum) have you ever mathed out the extra weight vs using alernator drag/draw ? it sounds real cool when you say plug in hybrid , but that is axactly what you got , cliff-e




(09-22-2009 06:32 AM)biggy boy Wrote:  Hi there!
I'm working on the same setup in the back of my pickup a couple of batterys, charge them at home at night and drive to work and back. The battries would be used to run the HHO gen Dry cell 18 plate (3) six cells in parelel.

Any way her is the post I have from another forum on my findings for the cost to charge a very large battery from a wall outlet.

Ok I did a test with one of the big batteries I’m planning on using to run my HHO gen.

The battery is an Exide Commercial Premium Heavy Duty. I have four of these.
Model F-4DLT

I hooked up two headlight bulbs to the test battery and ran the cells down to 4 Volts under load.
Disconnected the load and let it sit for 15 minutes to rebound
Back up. The battery rebounded back to 10.72 volts under NO load.
I then hooked up my 120 volt charger and set it for 10 amp charge setting.
Using a fluke clamp on meter to read the amp draw to the battery and a fluke bench tester to monitor the batteries voltage.
The charger was plugged into my new KWh meter.
At the 2 hour mark the battery was drawing 7.4 amps, On the low voltage side.
The charger was drawing 1.4 amps at 120 volts.

Here are the final recharge results:
Charge time 13 hours 12 minutes
Starting amperage DC 10amps
Max amps at start up 120volt 1.78amps
Max Watts at start up 120volt 187
Total KWh 1.62
My cost here in Ontario @$0.059 per KWh, this is average.
Non peak is $0.042
Peak is $0.076 average = $0.059
Total cost to charge battery = 9 cents
These numbers are direct read off from the KWh meter, that the charger is plugged into.

Man I need to get a better charger the 10 amp deal is too small.
This one is old and very basic not even an automatic.
I'm looking at getting one of the electronic pulse chargeres does up to 20 amps down to 2 amp trickle.

Glen
09-22-2009 09:54 AM
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