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series cells
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sleeper Offline
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Post: #1
series cells
Mike, or anyone with more knowledge than I have about wiring 3 cells in series.

Is it : Setup #1
Batt. pos. to cell #1 pos., then cell #1 neg.- to cell #2 pos., then cell #2 neg. to cell #3 pos. and cell #3 neg. to Batt. neg.?

OR: Setup #2
Batt. pos. to cell #1 pos. then #1 pos. to cell #2 pos. then #2 pos. to cell #3 pos.
Batt. neg. to cell #1 neg. then #1 neg. to cell #2 neg. then #2 neg.to cell #3 neg.
11-21-2008 07:03 AM
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AlexR Offline
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Post: #2
RE: series cells
sleeper Wrote:Mike, or anyone with more knowledge than I have about wiring 3 cells in series.

Is it : Setup #1
Batt. pos. to cell #1 pos., then cell #1 neg.- to cell #2 pos., then cell #2 neg. to cell #3 pos. and cell #3 neg. to Batt. neg.?

OR: Setup #2
Batt. pos. to cell #1 pos. then #1 pos. to cell #2 pos. then #2 pos. to cell #3 pos.
Batt. neg. to cell #1 neg. then #1 neg. to cell #2 neg. then #2 neg.to cell #3 neg.


Use option #1 - This is series

Option #2 you are just making a bigger parallel cell.

How about just designing a true series cell where the one unit uses 14v from your electrical system and you don't have to worry about overheating and/or amperage runaway?

Alex

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11-21-2008 08:06 AM
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sleeper Offline
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Post: #3
RE: series cells
Alex Wrote:How about just designing a true series cell where the one unit uses 14v from your electrical system and you don't have to worry about overheating and/or amperage runaway?

Alex. Give me an example of what you are referring to "true series cell". I plan to feed an '01 Cummings and that's my reason for three units.
(This post was last modified: 11-30-2008 09:09 AM by colchiro.)
11-21-2008 10:11 AM
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mike Offline
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Post: #4
RE: series cells
Sorry to butt in: But hi Alex! It's good to hear from you. Smile

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11-21-2008 10:25 AM
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colchiro Offline
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Post: #5
RE: series cells
Hi Mike, sorry to butt in, but we see more of Alex than we do of you...Wink

Rick

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11-21-2008 10:55 PM
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mike Offline
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RE: series cells
LOL!

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11-24-2008 09:13 AM
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AlexR Offline
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Post: #7
RE: series cells
Hi Guys!!

Alex

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11-29-2008 07:26 PM
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AlexR Offline
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Post: #8
RE: series cells
sleeper Wrote:[
How about just designing a true series cell where the one unit uses 14v from your electrical system and you don't have to worry about overheating and/or amperage runaway?

Alex. Give me an example of what you are referring to "true series cell". I plan to feed an '01 Cummings and that's my reason for three units.
[/quote]

Sleeper,

These "dry cells" that people are coming up with would make a good series cell if there was more spacing between the plates.

You're on the right track. Remember each parallel cell runs on 2 volts. The problem here is when 14 volts from the vehicle electrical system is applied to that cell. Its much like a direct short. That's why one has to use so little electrolyte in the water for the current to flow. If you use 6 to 7 of these parallel cells then you have basically made a series cell that will run well on a 14 volt system. The one big advantage is that you can increase the concentration of the electrolyte so freezing in winter is not a problem. Another advantage is that this cell does not get as hot as the traditional parallel plate designs. They have an overheating problem, series cells don't.

The surface area of the plates will determine the gas production - amp draw.

Alex

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11-29-2008 07:39 PM
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colchiro Offline
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Post: #9
RE: series cells
AlexR Wrote:These "dry cells" that people are coming up with would make a good series cell if there was more spacing between the plates.

There's several different variations of dry cells, mainly o-ring or gasket.

Alex, can you elaborate more on your spacing comment?

What I find interesting is that h2-only cells are becoming an option with dry cells now.

Rick

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11-30-2008 09:08 AM
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AlexR Offline
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Post: #10
RE: series cells
Rick,

I'll write up a more detailed post and start a new thread about the series cells. I've been pretty busy here the last few weeks, but will give this my attention and post it in the next day or two.

Alex

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11-30-2008 09:17 AM
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