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(super)heated gas?
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No way Offline
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Post: #1
(super)heated gas?
Hi there! I'm new here and have alot of ideas about HHO! I have experimented 6 months now.

I just shoot one question right away. Has anybody here tried to heat the HHO gas, before it enters the engine? F.ex in a copper tube around the exhaust manifold?

It seems that those guys who get the best mpg gain, has cells that heat up and in that way make the gas hotter. Are there perhaps any connection?
(This post was last modified: 07-14-2008 11:44 AM by No way.)
07-14-2008 11:43 AM
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howiemandel Offline
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Post: #2
RE: (super)heated gas?
No way Wrote:Hi there! I'm new here and have alot of ideas about HHO! I have experimented 6 months now.

I just shoot one question right away. Has anybody here tried to heat the HHO gas, before it enters the engine? F.ex in a copper tube around the exhaust manifold?

It seems that those guys who get the best mpg gain, has cells that heat up and in that way make the gas hotter. Are there perhaps any connection?

I just started this, just gassed up this morning. Used copper runnin' round the manifold before it goes into the throttle body. Not enough testing, but it doesnt look like its gonna help me, but again, not sure yet.
07-14-2008 11:50 AM
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No way Offline
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RE: (super)heated gas?
Ok. Let us now anyway! I was afraid it might explode, but obviosly it haven't for you.
07-14-2008 11:54 AM
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baracuda Offline
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RE: (super)heated gas?
Prior to heating the HHO. It would be good to know what your IAT sensor normally shows. Your ECU uses this along with a host of other sensor readings to adjust air/fuel ratio, injector timing, spark advance, etc.

It's possible that heating the HHO would improve gains but I wonder if just heating the intake air alone without HHO makes any difference?

You can't skin a fish before you catch it !
07-14-2008 03:10 PM
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howiemandel Offline
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RE: (super)heated gas?
baracuda Wrote:Prior to heating the HHO. It would be good to know what your IAT sensor normally shows. Your ECU uses this along with a host of other sensor readings to adjust air/fuel ratio, injector timing, spark advance, etc.

It's possible that heating the HHO would improve gains but I wonder if just heating the intake air alone without HHO makes any difference?

Wouldnt you want cold air going into the intake? It would seem to me
Hot fuel, cold air, warm engine = perfection. Then again, i remember guys chillin the fuel instead of heating it for performance or horsepower. Not sure about mileage gains. I dont know theres alot of varibles. Its gettin intresting thats for sure.
07-14-2008 03:45 PM
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CheezWiz Offline
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RE: (super)heated gas?
I think this will have a negative effect. Heating the HHO will decrease its density and result in less of it taking up a greater space. That means less in each cylinder.

You want to heat the fuel because that gets it closer to its vapor point. HHO is already past that...

Cold air is not necessarily good either as there is a target temperature where the engine will be most efficient and I know that cold goes in the wrong direction. In turbos, the air goes through an intercooler because compressing the air produces heat... A lot of heat... But in cold climates you will see big trucks covering their grills because the cold air will reduce fuel efficiency.

Not sure what cooling the gas would do that changing the fuel mixture would not accomplish...
07-14-2008 04:49 PM
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baracuda Offline
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RE: (super)heated gas?
CheezWiz Wrote:Cold air is not necessarily good either as there is a target temperature where the engine will be most efficient and I know that cold goes in the wrong direction.

I agree.
Cold air intakes have been developed for horspower. The cooler temperature forces the ECU to adjust by adding more fuel, not much but still more, in order to reach that target

I believe if you heated the intake air or tricked the AIT to give a false signal equal to hotter air. Then the ECU would adjust by reducing the fuel in the fuel/air ratio.

This is just an educated guess, as I have not done or proven this.

You can't skin a fish before you catch it !
(This post was last modified: 07-14-2008 05:38 PM by baracuda.)
07-14-2008 05:37 PM
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Gary Offline
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RE: (super)heated gas?
Ducting heated air into the intake is a trick used by a lot of the guys on gassavers.com. It makes it run leaner. You want power, you use cold air.
07-15-2008 03:07 PM
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tjh566 Offline
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Post: #9
RE: (super)heated gas?
CheezWiz Wrote:I think this will have a negative effect. Heating the HHO will decrease its density and result in less of it taking up a greater space. That means less in each cylinder.

You want to heat the fuel because that gets it closer to its vapor point. HHO is already past that...

Cold air is not necessarily good either as there is a target temperature where the engine will be most efficient and I know that cold goes in the wrong direction. In turbos, the air goes through an intercooler because compressing the air produces heat... A lot of heat... But in cold climates you will see big trucks covering their grills because the cold air will reduce fuel efficiency.

Not sure what cooling the gas would do that changing the fuel mixture would not accomplish...


I agree that cold air isn't necessarily good, its good for HP but not for savings, But the reason why trucks cover there grills is to keep the engine at the right operating temperature, not because of cold air going into the intake but because the radiator is letting too much engine heat out lowering the operating temperature below what it needs to be. Cars and trucks have thermostats to maintain this temperature.


@Gary: instead of ducting hot air into the intake reducing horsepower just put a resistor on the IAT to trick the computer and lean it out some.
(This post was last modified: 07-15-2008 03:15 PM by tjh566.)
07-15-2008 03:14 PM
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Gary Offline
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RE: (super)heated gas?
I believe that the theory goes, the hotter the intake air, the better the combustion as well as lean burn. That figures in line with the extra heat we get from HHO helping combustion as well, so it seems plausible.
07-15-2008 03:56 PM
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