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why not baking soda
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Mintoy Offline
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Post: #1
why not baking soda
hi guys,

after reading and watching stuff in the net. some guys say not to use baking soda. but some sites do recommend the use of baking soda. my question is. what will be the good and bad effects if i use baking soda as my electrolyte? thanks for all your inputs:-)

mintoy
05-30-2011 09:02 AM
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mike Offline
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Post: #2
RE: why not baking soda
Search this site on "baking soda", and see the posts that have already been written.

KOH (potassium hydroxide), is the catalyst of choice for HHO systems.

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05-31-2011 10:15 AM
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David Gonzales Offline
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RE: why not baking soda
From what I have seen it will cause a lot of anode mud to build up in your hydrolyzer.

This is the red silt like stuff that settles to the bottom of the container and makes it a real PIA to clean out and get the plates back to a clean condition (where they work better and produce the most gas).

It still will do this to a certain extent especially if you are drawing to many volts like my system was before I reworked it with a bunch of nuetral plates. It would get way hot and turn the water red in about 1/2 hour.

I think it is due to the electrolite and heat eating up the plates and from what I have seen Sodium Hydroxide and Potassium Hydroxide seem to be the most preferred eletrolites as they help keep this corrosion to a minimum.
06-06-2011 11:30 AM
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Mintoy Offline
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RE: why not baking soda
(06-06-2011 11:30 AM)David Gonzales Wrote:  From what I have seen it will cause a lot of anode mud to build up in your hydrolyzer.

This is the red silt like stuff that settles to the bottom of the container and makes it a real PIA to clean out and get the plates back to a clean condition (where they work better and produce the most gas).

It still will do this to a certain extent especially if you are drawing to many volts like my system was before I reworked it with a bunch of nuetral plates. It would get way hot and turn the water red in about 1/2 hour.

I think it is due to the electrolite and heat eating up the plates and from what I have seen Sodium Hydroxide and Potassium Hydroxide seem to be the most preferred eletrolites as they help keep this corrosion to a minimum.

thanks for the reply. so it's the corrosion thats the problem. thanks
06-11-2011 11:56 PM
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mike Offline
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RE: why not baking soda
That's not the only problem. It has at least 2 others:

1) It's not very effective.

2) It gets consumed. You have to constantly replenish it. This will cause you to have inconsistent concentration as the electrolyte is being consumed.

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06-16-2011 07:57 AM
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jamey550 Offline
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Post: #6
RE: why not baking soda
Baking soda is not very important as electrolyte...
it is not quite useful for the purpose as mike said it needs to be replenish constantly thats y some doesnt recommend it
08-16-2011 04:55 AM
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LHazleton Offline
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Post: #7
RE: why not baking soda
Besides not being a good elyte to begin with, when used in a reactor it produces chlorine gas.
08-16-2011 05:31 PM
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mike Offline
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RE: why not baking soda
Actually, baking soda doesn't make chlorine gas. But some folks have tried using table salt, which does produce chlorine gas. You've probably seen those reports.

Table salt = NaCl, which is one sodium atom bonded with one chlorine atom. Since table salt isn't a true catalyst in the production of HHO, it is consumed, and when the sodium is used the chlorine is freed up to escape as a highly toxic gas.

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08-17-2011 08:09 AM
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Paulusgnome Offline
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RE: why not baking soda
Baking soda is sodium bicarbonate, chemical formula NaHCO3. When it is electrolysed, the bicarbonate ion - thats the HCO3 bit, decomposes into a hydroxide ion (OH) and a molecule of carbon dioxide (CO2).
What this means is that your electrolyser turns the baking soda into lye (NAOH) and feeds CO2 into your engine, hardly a performance enhancer.
To further nail the coffin shut on baking soda, it also eats stainless steel plates as other posters have advised.
08-19-2011 01:01 AM
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